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Welcome to the Britlish Library.

I hope you will enjoy the 242 British English lessons in the Britlish Library. I have designed the lessons to help you improve all areas of your English skills from writing and speaking, to listening and reading.

The British English lessons in the Britlish Library are full of multimedia content in the form of videos, audio files, animations, and engaging image files. This multimedia content makes learning British English much more fun and engaging than simply reading text in a book.


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Latest British English Lessons

Here are the 5 newest British English lessons from the Britlish Library. I regularly add new lessons to the Britlish Library so make sure you bookmark this page.

Food and Drink Collocations

Food and Drink Collocations

Collocations are ground of words which normally go together such as paint a picture. To say make a picture or do a picture sound strange to native English speakers. If you use the correct collocations when speaking or writing in English, you will sound much more natural and much more like a native British English speaker. This lesson looks at some common collocations to do with food and eating. Makes notes of the new vocabulary in your personal Study Record which you will find on each lesson page in the Britlish Library. This language is very useful for students who plan to take exams. This is one of the five-minute collocations series of lessons and should take you about 5 minutes to complete.


A Nice Cup of Tea

A Nice Cup of Tea

In 1946, George Orwell wrote an article giving his 11 golden rules for making the perfect cup of tea. This English lesson looks at the following vocabulary from the essay: cauldron, china teapot, silver teapot, enamel teapot, pewter teapot, golden rule, heaped teaspoon, hob, infuse, kettle, misguided, quart, rationing, sickly, sketchy, spout, swill out, teapot, urn, vulgar, and wring out.


Decline of the English Murder

Decline of the English Murder

This lesson uses Orwell's Decline of the English Murder essay to introduce you to the following vocabulary items: Acquit, Armchair, Blissful, Cause célèbre, Cherish, Cleft chin, Culprit, Cunning, Forfeit, Fretful, Hypocrisy, Legacy, Pipe, Re-hash, Scandal, Sofa, Sordid, Spectacles, V1 and V2, and Wanton.


Its or It's Conversation Simulation

Its or It's Conversation Simulation

In this lesson, we will look at some common mistakes that even native English speakers make when it comes to using its and it's. Learn how to use these correctly and you will never again make the common mistakes that make you look not quite as proficient at English as you might like to look.


Tongue Idioms

Tongue Idioms

This lesson will help you to learn, remember, and use 12 common English idioms about the tongue. The 12 idioms are, set tongues wagging, silver tongued, loose tongue, tongue in cheek, sharp tongue, get tongue around, wicked tongue, on the tip of your tongue, civil tongue, tongue-lashing, cat got your tongue, and bite or hold your tongue.


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Random British English Lessons

Here are three random British English lessons taken from the 242 British English lessons currently in the Britlish Library. I add new lessons every week, so be sure to bookmark this page. Sign up for a free membership and you will get an email each time I add a new lesson to the library.

A Deadly Lesson - An English Murder Mystery

A Deadly Lesson - An English Murder Mystery

Created using industry-leading e-learning software, English Mysteries are finding new ways to make learning interesting, engaging, and effective, through the gamification of the learning process. Interact with each character and ask questions to help you uncover their secrets and reveal the clues that will help you accuse the right character of the crime. To check that you understand everything you have been told by each character, you will have to pass a knowledge check before progressing to the next round. You will find important clues in each round which, if you pay careful attention, will help you understand each character’s motives for committing the crime. As you investigate the characters you will come to understand them and the little secrets they might rather keep hidden. You get hours of entertaining content including hundreds of carefully crafted images, numerous sound files, plenty of knowledge checks, a glossary to help you, numerous clues to consider and much, much more besides. With compelling story lines and interesting characters, English Mysteries help the student learn English by fully engaging them in each round of the game. To correctly solve the mystery, the player must understand what they are reading, hearing, and learning.

 
 

Words Ending in -try

Words Ending in -try

A vocabulary and pronunciation activator which will help you with the following words: try, entry, gantry, pantry, poetry, pastry, paltry, sultry, wintry, country, poultry, ancestry, industry, forestry, toiletry, dentistry, chemistry, carpentry, circuitry, and psychiatry. Not only will you learn how to use each of the words, but you will also learn how to pronounce sentences using them. I have analysed the speech features of each of the sentences to show you how English pronunciation works and to help you improve your own pronunciation, too. You can read each sentence in IPA symbols, too, giving you the chance to see how linking features like the linking R, the linking J, the linking W, and linking consonants work.


Syllabic Consonants in Words Ending *LE

Syllabic Consonants in Words Ending *LE

A syllabic consonant is a consonant that is pronounced as a syllable. The two main syllabic consonants in English are /l/ or /n/ sounds. The /l/ syllabic consonant occurs at the end of the word bottle, while the /n/ occurs in words like listen. Syllabic consonants occur mainly in the final syllable of words. In this lesson, we will look at the 11 possible letter combinations that can result in a final-syllable /l/ syllabic consonant: a syllable which has a consonant not a vowel as the peak. I have chosen one word for each of the following endings which produce a syllable consonant: -ble, -cle, -dle, -fle, -gle, -kle, -ple, -sle, -tle, -xle, and -zle. Some of these combinations have many examples, while others have few. There are no other -*le endings in English words which produce the /l/ syllabic consonant.


Fleece

Fleece

Fleece is a man-made fabric made from a plastic fibre called polyester. The polyester fleece fabric was first created in the 1970s by the company Malden Mills. As Malden Mills chose not to patent their invention, the inexpensive fleece was soon available to everyone and its popularity has since far exceeded that of wool. This lesson looks at vocabulary associated with fleeces and wool.


Tongue Idioms

Tongue Idioms

This lesson will help you to learn, remember, and use 12 common English idioms about the tongue. The 12 idioms are, set tongues wagging, silver tongued, loose tongue, tongue in cheek, sharp tongue, get tongue around, wicked tongue, on the tip of your tongue, civil tongue, tongue-lashing, cat got your tongue, and bite or hold your tongue.


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Britlish Library English Lesson Categories

I have categorised the lessons in the Britlish library into the following categories: English in Use lessons, Tests lessons, Grammar lessons, Humour lessons, Idioms lessons, Information lessons, Literature lessons, Phrasal Verbs lessons, Pronunciation lessons, Spelling lessons, Vocabulary lessons, Writing lessons, Sounds Rude lessons, Conversation Simulations lessons, and more.

You can select all of the lessons in each of the random categories by clicking on any of the images below.

Information

Information

Some lessons about how to do things in the Britlish Library, from using the Britlish Library Memoriser or the most common words system, to frequently asked questions, requesting lessons, and booking online English classes. If you are interested in using the Britlish library to its full potential, you will need to learn how to use the systems that I have created for you. These lessons will take you through each of the systems in some detail to let you see how to use them and how they can help you in your studies at Britlish. The systems are mainly concerned with helping you to memorise new vocabulary or to keep track of your progress in the many lessons that you will find in the Britlish Library. I hope that you will find these instructional lessons useful and that they will encourage you to make full use of the Britlish Library.

 

Vocabulary

Vocabulary

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be.

Tests

Tests

If you are preparing for one of the internationally recognised exams such as IELTS, or the exams from Cambridge Assessment English, or Trinity, then the lessons in this category will be very useful to your studies. If you simply want to test your English abilities in and see how you are progressing in your studies of English as a second or foreign language, then the tests in this category will help you. You can test your abilities in English by seeing if you make the same mistakes that advanced users of English or even proficient users of English make. There's also an English level test with a hundred questions to test your general level of English. Don't be afraid of making mistakes, as it's through mistakes that we improve in anything we do, including learning English.


Grammar

Grammar

These lessons focus on the grammar of English. English grammar compared to other grammars is quite simple, but in its simplicity lies its complexity. The lessons here cover all aspects of English grammar from the aspects and tenses to sentence structures. English grammar covers the structure of words, phrases, clauses, sentences, and entire texts. There are eight parts of speech in English: nouns, determiners, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions. The largest of these parts of speech are the nouns which, unlike most European languages, do not have grammatical gender. English grammar has largely done away with the inflectional case system of other European languages and bases its grammar on analytic constructions. The lessons in this category will go some way to helping you get a better understanding of English grammar.

 
 

Writing

Writing

One of the four core skills of language is writing. The other three are reading, listening, and speaking. Because, like speaking, writing is a productive skill, it is not quite so easy to teach remotely as it is to teach in one-to-one classes online. Nevertheless, I have attempted in these lessons to provide you with a means to practice some writing, and provide some feedback through the interactive component.

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