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Welcome to the Britlish Library.

I hope you will enjoy the 242 British English lessons in the Britlish Library. I have designed the lessons to help you improve all areas of your English skills from writing and speaking, to listening and reading.

The British English lessons in the Britlish Library are full of multimedia content in the form of videos, audio files, animations, and engaging image files. This multimedia content makes learning British English much more fun and engaging than simply reading text in a book.


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Latest British English Lessons

Here are the 5 newest British English lessons from the Britlish Library. I regularly add new lessons to the Britlish Library so make sure you bookmark this page.

Food and Drink Collocations

Food and Drink Collocations

Collocations are ground of words which normally go together such as paint a picture. To say make a picture or do a picture sound strange to native English speakers. If you use the correct collocations when speaking or writing in English, you will sound much more natural and much more like a native British English speaker. This lesson looks at some common collocations to do with food and eating. Makes notes of the new vocabulary in your personal Study Record which you will find on each lesson page in the Britlish Library. This language is very useful for students who plan to take exams. This is one of the five-minute collocations series of lessons and should take you about 5 minutes to complete.


A Nice Cup of Tea

A Nice Cup of Tea

In 1946, George Orwell wrote an article giving his 11 golden rules for making the perfect cup of tea. This English lesson looks at the following vocabulary from the essay: cauldron, china teapot, silver teapot, enamel teapot, pewter teapot, golden rule, heaped teaspoon, hob, infuse, kettle, misguided, quart, rationing, sickly, sketchy, spout, swill out, teapot, urn, vulgar, and wring out.


Decline of the English Murder

Decline of the English Murder

This lesson uses Orwell's Decline of the English Murder essay to introduce you to the following vocabulary items: Acquit, Armchair, Blissful, Cause célèbre, Cherish, Cleft chin, Culprit, Cunning, Forfeit, Fretful, Hypocrisy, Legacy, Pipe, Re-hash, Scandal, Sofa, Sordid, Spectacles, V1 and V2, and Wanton.


Its or It's Conversation Simulation

Its or It's Conversation Simulation

In this lesson, we will look at some common mistakes that even native English speakers make when it comes to using its and it's. Learn how to use these correctly and you will never again make the common mistakes that make you look not quite as proficient at English as you might like to look.


Tongue Idioms

Tongue Idioms

This lesson will help you to learn, remember, and use 12 common English idioms about the tongue. The 12 idioms are, set tongues wagging, silver tongued, loose tongue, tongue in cheek, sharp tongue, get tongue around, wicked tongue, on the tip of your tongue, civil tongue, tongue-lashing, cat got your tongue, and bite or hold your tongue.


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Random British English Lessons

Here are three random British English lessons taken from the 242 British English lessons currently in the Britlish Library. I add new lessons every week, so be sure to bookmark this page. Sign up for a free membership and you will get an email each time I add a new lesson to the library.

Parrot

Parrot

English humour can be difficult for non-native English speakers. This is why simple English jokes are a very good way of teaching vocabulary, and why I’ve chosen a very simple joke for this lesson. I’m not going to write the punchline of the joke here, but the tag line is “What’s orange and sounds like a parrot?” You can listen to the joke here and then do the exercises where you can learn about why it is so funny. You will also learn about how word play and the double meaning of words in English are the basis for much of its humour. There are interactive exercises in this lesson that will help you to see why this joke is funny.

 
 
 
 

Changes in Fast Speech

Changes in Fast Speech

Practice hearing the changes in fast spoken speech. When we speak quickly, sounds that we expect to hear may be missing. It’s not only sounds that go missing in fast spoken English. Whole words may disappear, too. Sounds also change in fast spoken English and some words will not sound the same as they do when spoken slowly, or the way they are shown in dictionaries. In these exercises, I want you to try to hear what changes are taking place in the fast spoken sentences. We will look in greater detail at the changes in later lessons in this Sounds British Pronunciation Course. Changes in Fast Speech.


Acre - Hard to Say

Acre - Hard to Say

The word acre is a difficult word to spell and to pronounce. In this lesson I’ll tell you what acre means, show you how to pronounce it with a standard British English accent, and give you some examples of its use. I’ll also look at other vocabulary which is associated with acres such as area, bake, break, fake, furrow, heartache, length, long, make, medieval, narrow, ox, oxen, plough, quake, rule of thumb, shake, soil, support, take, wake, and yard. You can also practice your knowledge of the IPA symbols and pronunciation with some IPA transcriptions of these words associated with acre.

 

/ h / in Hat

/ h / in Hat

Activate the consonant sound / h / in Hat. In this Pronunciation Activation Pack we will be looking at the unvoiced glottal fricative consonant sound / h /. We will look at the letter combinations that give the / h / sound. We will look at lots of words which have the / h / sound in them. Finally, we will activate your ability to hear and produce the / h / sound correctly. The / h / sound is a glottal fricative. It is basically just an exhalation of breath, the smoothness of which is broken by a slight constriction of the throat around the glottis. The / h / sound on the chart is shown in blue, which means that is it is unvoiced. Letter Combinations for / h / - This unvoiced glottal fricative only has these letter combinations: H, and WH.

 

Past Perfect Continuous - GA11

Past Perfect Continuous - GA11

Regular verbs form their past tense by adding ed. Irregular verbs have a past tense form that you must learn individually. Remember, too, that the continuous aspect of the past tense is marked by the auxiliary verb be plus the ing form of a verb. If you see the verb be followed by an ing form, it’s the continuous aspect. Verb to be plus ing! is really all you need to know to identify the continuous aspect. So, if had plus a past participle gives us the perfect aspect, and be +ing gives us the continuous aspect, then together we get the past tense, perfect continuous aspect. I had been teaching in schools for 5 years before I decided to teach exclusively online using Skype. While it is easy to name the aspects and the tenses, what is less clear is how, when, and where we should use the past perfect continuous. In this Grammar Activation Pack we will look at the past tense, perfect continuous aspect. The past tense tells us about things which happened in the past. The perfect aspect uses a past participle, and this also talks about the past. The continuous aspect talks about something happening over a period of time; in this case from an earlier time in the past to another later time in the past. Like the past perfect, the past perfect continuous talks about an earlier past in a later past. Let’s look at some examples of usage to see what this means. This British English grammar is essential for all students of English and the many exercises in the pack will help you master it quickly and enjoyably.

 
 

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Britlish Library English Lesson Categories

I have categorised the lessons in the Britlish library into the following categories: English in Use lessons, Tests lessons, Grammar lessons, Humour lessons, Idioms lessons, Information lessons, Literature lessons, Phrasal Verbs lessons, Pronunciation lessons, Spelling lessons, Vocabulary lessons, Writing lessons, Sounds Rude lessons, Conversation Simulations lessons, and more.

You can select all of the lessons in each of the random categories by clicking on any of the images below.

Conversation Simulations

Conversation Simulations

Conversation or dialogue simulations use the latest technology to bring you as close an experience as you can get to an actual English conversation. By imitating real world conversations, you can practice your communication skills on any device and receive instant feedback on your mistakes and your accuracy. The conversation simulators also give you the chance to look at specific areas of English where you might be having problems.


Vocabulary

Vocabulary

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be.

Idioms

Idioms

Once I realised that idioms were incredibly problematic for my students, I set about gathering as many idioms as I could and making videos about them for my YouTube channels. I am determined to make idioms as accessible for all students as any other part of the English language. Reading and memorising lists of vocabulary is not the most productive, interesting, or useful exercise in English language learning. I wanted to create a series of lessons in the form of Activation Packs that would encourage the reader to not only learn and remember the idioms, but also to have fun with them, as having fun is a great aid to learning and remembering. It is important that you know as many idioms as possible as native English speakers use them with alarming regularity. I hope that as you work your way through the Idiom Activation Packs you will make some of the idioms your own and use them regularly like a native.

Sounds Rude

Sounds Rude

There is an important subset of English which is hardly ever touched on by teachers, and never by the textbooks. This subset of English is the English which sounds rude. The swearwords and curses, which make up a surprisingly large part of daily speech, are neglected by most teachers because, well, they sound rude. This course aims not to titillate but to teach the vocabulary that other teachers shy away from. If you are not offended by strong language, and would like to learn, remember, and use this "taboo" language, then you should take a look at these lessons. Please do not complain if you are shocked by the contents. You have been warned.

Grammar

Grammar

These lessons focus on the grammar of English. English grammar compared to other grammars is quite simple, but in its simplicity lies its complexity. The lessons here cover all aspects of English grammar from the aspects and tenses to sentence structures. English grammar covers the structure of words, phrases, clauses, sentences, and entire texts. There are eight parts of speech in English: nouns, determiners, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions. The largest of these parts of speech are the nouns which, unlike most European languages, do not have grammatical gender. English grammar has largely done away with the inflectional case system of other European languages and bases its grammar on analytic constructions. The lessons in this category will go some way to helping you get a better understanding of English grammar.

 
 

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