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Welcome to the Britlish Library.

I hope you will enjoy the 239 British English lessons in the Britlish Library. I have designed the lessons to help you improve all areas of your English skills from writing and speaking, to listening and reading.

The British English lessons in the Britlish Library are full of multimedia content in the form of videos, audio files, animations, and engaging image files. This multimedia content makes learning British English much more fun and engaging than simply reading text in a book.


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Latest British English Lessons

Here are the 5 newest British English lessons from the Britlish Library. I regularly add new lessons to the Britlish Library so make sure you bookmark this page.

Its or It's Conversation Simulation

Its or It's Conversation Simulation

In this lesson, we will look at some common mistakes that even native English speakers make when it comes to using its and it's. Learn how to use these correctly and you will never again make the common mistakes that make you look not quite as proficient at English as you might like to look.


Tongue Idioms

Tongue Idioms

This lesson will help you to learn, remember, and use 12 common English idioms about the tongue. The 12 idioms are, set tongues wagging, silver tongued, loose tongue, tongue in cheek, sharp tongue, get tongue around, wicked tongue, on the tip of your tongue, civil tongue, tongue-lashing, cat got your tongue, and bite or hold your tongue.


Digestive System Idioms

Digestive System Idioms

This British English idioms lesson will help to you learn, remember, and use 18 common British English idiomatic expressions to do with the digestive system. The 18 idioms are, cast-iron stomach, go belly up, to be yellow-bellied, hate someone's guts, gutted, gut-wrenching, not able to or cannot stomach something, a fire in your belly, sick to the stomach, a gut reaction or feeling, butterflies in your stomach, misery guts, turn the stomach, in the pit of your stomach, I have no stomach for something, have guts, to have a strong stomach, and have a bellyful of something.


Cheek, Chest, Chin Idioms

Cheek, Chest, Chin Idioms

This British English idioms lesson will help to you learn, remember, and use 7 common British English idiomatic expressions which use the words cheek, chest, and chin. The 7 idioms are, turn the other cheek, tongue in cheek, cheek by jowl, get something off your chest, keep something close to your chest, take it on the chin, and keep your chin up.


Bottom Idioms

Bottom Idioms

This British English idioms lesson will help to you learn, remember, and use 12 common British English idiomatic expressions which use the word bottom. The 12 idioms are, at the bottom of the ladder, learn something from the bottom up, to be at the bottom of something, the bottom of the barrel, bottoms up, the bottom line, smooth as a baby's bottom, from top to bottom, the bottom drawer, to hit rock bottom, from the bottom of my heart, and the bottom fell out of.


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Random British English Lessons

Here are three random British English lessons taken from the 239 British English lessons currently in the Britlish Library. I add new lessons every week, so be sure to bookmark this page. Sign up for a free membership and you will get an email each time I add a new lesson to the library.

Recommend

Recommend

Rocío from Spain, and several other students, have asked me to recommend the best ways to use the word recommend. The verb recommend is used to offer suggestions as to what to do or where to go. We recommend things to others based on our personal experiences. I recommend that you do this lesson and see how we use this verb and I recommend that you take a look at this lesson if you have trouble using the verb recommend

 

Past Perfect Continuous - GA11

Past Perfect Continuous - GA11

Regular verbs form their past tense by adding ed. Irregular verbs have a past tense form that you must learn individually. Remember, too, that the continuous aspect of the past tense is marked by the auxiliary verb be plus the ing form of a verb. If you see the verb be followed by an ing form, it’s the continuous aspect. Verb to be plus ing! is really all you need to know to identify the continuous aspect. So, if had plus a past participle gives us the perfect aspect, and be +ing gives us the continuous aspect, then together we get the past tense, perfect continuous aspect. I had been teaching in schools for 5 years before I decided to teach exclusively online using Skype. While it is easy to name the aspects and the tenses, what is less clear is how, when, and where we should use the past perfect continuous. In this Grammar Activation Pack we will look at the past tense, perfect continuous aspect. The past tense tells us about things which happened in the past. The perfect aspect uses a past participle, and this also talks about the past. The continuous aspect talks about something happening over a period of time; in this case from an earlier time in the past to another later time in the past. Like the past perfect, the past perfect continuous talks about an earlier past in a later past. Let’s look at some examples of usage to see what this means. This British English grammar is essential for all students of English and the many exercises in the pack will help you master it quickly and enjoyably.

 
 

Parsimonious

Parsimonious

Whether you have money or not, there is a lot of vocabulary in English to do with it. This lesson will help you talk about being careful with your money to being miserly with it. Whether you are generous with your money, or a total Scrooge, you will find the vocabulary in this lesson useful.


Choir - Hard to Say

Choir - Hard to Say

The word choir is a difficult word to spell and to pronounce. In this lesson I’ll tell you what choir means, show you how to pronounce it with a standard British English accent, and give you some examples of its use. I’ll also look at other vocabulary which begins with CHO but do not necessarily have the same pronunciation such as chocolate, choir, choke, cholesterol, chondrite, choose, choosy, chop, choral, chord, chore, choreographer, chorister, chorizo, chortle, chorus, chosen, chough, chow, and chowder. You can also practice your knowledge of the IPA symbols and pronunciation with some IPA transcriptions of these CHO words.


Countable and Uncountable Nouns

Countable and Uncountable Nouns

I made a lot of video English lessons in 2010 as part of my Daily Dose of English series. Unfortunately, they never became quite as popular as I hoped they would. Nevertheless, they were interesting and relevant then and they remain so today. I have taken a video English lesson about countable and uncountable nouns and have turned it into this Britlish Library lesson. The technology I now use for my lessons allows me to explore the subject of countable and uncountable nouns in much greater detail than a simple video English lesson allows. Try this more active way of learning and see how countable and uncountable nouns really work. You will also learn about definite and indefinite articles.


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Britlish Library English Lesson Categories

I have categorised the lessons in the Britlish library into the following categories: English in Use lessons, Tests lessons, Grammar lessons, Humour lessons, Idioms lessons, Information lessons, Literature lessons, Phrasal Verbs lessons, Pronunciation lessons, Spelling lessons, Vocabulary lessons, Writing lessons, Sounds Rude lessons, Conversation Simulations lessons, and more.

You can select all of the lessons in each of the random categories by clicking on any of the images below.

Pronunciation

Pronunciation

No matter how good your English grammar and vocabulary may be, if your pronunciation is so bad that nobody can understand a word you say, then you are at a grave disadvantage in regards to your English. These lessons have been designed to help you to improve your pronunciation, as well as other areas of your English.

Sounds Rude

Sounds Rude

There is an important subset of English which is hardly ever touched on by teachers, and never by the textbooks. This subset of English is the English which sounds rude. The swearwords and curses, which make up a surprisingly large part of daily speech, are neglected by most teachers because, well, they sound rude. This course aims not to titillate but to teach the vocabulary that other teachers shy away from. If you are not offended by strong language, and would like to learn, remember, and use this "taboo" language, then you should take a look at these lessons. Please do not complain if you are shocked by the contents. You have been warned.

Spelling

Spelling

One of the most difficult parts of English is spelling. This is because many of the sounds in English are not always represented by the same letter combinations. This for this reason, even native English speakers find it difficult to spell some words. These lessons have been created to help you to learn how to spell some of the more difficult English words.

Conversation Simulations

Conversation Simulations

Conversation or dialogue simulations use the latest technology to bring you as close an experience as you can get to an actual English conversation. By imitating real world conversations, you can practice your communication skills on any device and receive instant feedback on your mistakes and your accuracy. The conversation simulators also give you the chance to look at specific areas of English where you might be having problems.


Humour

Humour

These English Lessons are built around English jokes. The jokes may be old or new; they may be very funny or just amusing. The language of the joke is explored and you will begin to understand a very important aspect of the English language - humour. Many students of English, be they students of English as a second language or of English as a foreign language, find it very difficult to "get" English jokes. British humour has a strong satirical element aimed at showing the absurdity of everyday life. A lot of English humour depends on cultural knowledge and the themes commonly include the British class system, wit, innuendo, to boost subjects and puns, self-deprecation, sarcasm, and insults. As well as this, English humour is often delivered in a deadpan way or is considered by many to be insensitive. A particular aspect of British English humour is the humour of the macabre, were topics that are usually treated seriously are treated in a very humorous or satirical way.

 

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