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All 257 Lessons Alphabetically Listed.

There are currently 257 British English lessons in the Britlish Library and I regularly add new lessons. The grid below shows you the 257 lessons available arranged alphabetically from A to Z. Use the navigation buttons to look through them. If you want to concentrate on a particular area of English, choose the category view instead.


New-Old Cat Top Rand IPA

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Idiom Activation Pack - Food Idioms 9

Idioms are expressions that are natural to native English speakers. They are very confusing for non-native English speakers. They're confusing because idioms don't mean what the words say. You cannot literally translate English idioms into another language. The vocabulary in this British English lesson is important for students to learn and master. There are a lot of idioms in this lesson as well as a set of questions which I have designed to help you learn, remember, and use the vocabulary and make it part of your active vocabulary. If you are serious about improving your British English vocabulary, these common British English idioms are essential. The food idioms are: Red herring, Look to laurels, A different kettle of fish, Chicken and egg, Jam down throat, Too many cooks, Drive bananas, Easy meat, Spill the beans, and Half-baked.


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Idioms Activation Pack - Arms

There are 13 arms idioms in this Idiom Activation Pack. To be up in arms, Have one arm tied behind your back, Cost an arm and a leg, Lay down your arms, Strong-arm tactics, Keep somebody at arm’s length, Have a list as long as your arm, To give your right arm, Welcome someone with open arms, The long arm of the law, Twist someone’s arm, Chance your arm, and To bear arms. After you have seen, heard, and read the idioms and their meanings, you can activate them and make them part of your active vocabulary. You can do this by using the Idioms Activator which I have designed to give you plenty of practice in listening, reading, and writing the idioms you have learnt in this Idiom Activation Pack. These Idiom Activation Packs are designed to help you activate your English skills. I have been helping students learn, remember, and use the all-important idiomatic expressions for many years and now I want to reach many more students by using the latest technology. I have designed this Idiom Activation Pack to make learning British English idioms as easy and enjoyable as possible. Idioms Activation Pack - Arms


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If-

The poem, If-, by Rudyard Kipling was written around 1895, shortly after the birth of Kipling’s son, John. The poem is an example of Victorian stoicism and takes the form of the author’s paternal advice to his son. John Kipling was reported as wounded and missing in 1915 while serving as a Lieutenant during World War I, a post his father had secured him thanks to his social connections and despite his son’s severe myopia. His grave was not identified until 1992. You can read this poem in Latin script and in IPA script as well as listen to me read it for you.


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In a Jiffy

Learn the phrase in a Jiffy in just a few minutes. This conversation simulation will help you to see just how we use the common English phrase, in a jiffy. A conversation simulation is the closest you can get to a real live conversation with a native English speaker. You will hear how a native English speaker might respond to a series of questions or statements and can practice your own speaking when working your way through this conversation. Conversations simulations are created using the latest e-learning technology and can give you a learning experience unlike anything you can find in a book, and quite unlike most of the material you find on other English learning websites.


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In a Row

To say that things are in a row means that they are arranged in a line next to one another either in space or time. By extension, the idiomatic expression, in a row, means that several events happen consecutively, one after the other. This lesson will help you to use this common expression. We need to be careful with the word row, however, as it has several meanings and even different pronunciation. The first meaning is a noun meaning an arrangement of objects side by side in a line as in a row of books on the shelf. The second meaning is a verb meaning to propel a boat using oars as in he rowed the rowing boat across the lake. The third meaning is a noun and verb meaning to have an angry dispute as in he had a row with his wife about his drinking.


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Influenza and Illness

In today’s virus-ravaged world, it is important to learn the language you need to speak about viruses and illness. This lesson will give you all the information you need. It’s based on a video English lesson I made in 2011 when I came down with flu. I thought I should revisit it during the Great Lockdown of 2020. After watching the videos, do the quiz to practice what you have learnt.


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Into, In To, In

The problem of using in to, or into is a problem that even native speakers of English face. It’s a problem because in spoken English there is no difference in pronunciation between the two. Nevertheless, both into and in to have different meanings which are important in written English. In this lesson I’ll explain the differences and help you to get them right. If you're ready to dive into this lesson, click the link below.


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Inversion

Inversion is the reversal of the usual order of the words in an English sentence. The normal order of an English sentence is subject – verb – object. We use inversion for various effects. There are two types of inversion in English. Subject and verb inversion to become verb – subject. Subject and auxiliary inversion to become auxiliary – subject – verb. This English Activation Pack will tell you all you need to know about how and when to use inversion. The pack contains an Activation Quiz with over 250 questions designed to get you using inversion properly. Each time you do the quiz you will be given 10 random questions. This way, you will be able to get hours of practice constructing sentences with inversion. Inversion


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Irregular English Verbs Activator

All of the most common irregular English verbs are here pronounced and spelt to help you master them. The verbs are: eat, awake, beat, become, begin, bend, beset, bet, bid, bite, bleed, blow, bear, buy, bind, breed, break, bring, build, burn, burst, bust, come, cast, catch, choose, clothe, cling, cost, creep, crossbreed, cut, deal, do, disprove, dive, drink, dream, draw, drive, dig, dwell, feed, fall, feel, fit, flee, fly, fling, forsake, fight, find, freeze, give, get, grow, grind, have, hear, hold, hew, hide, hit, hang, hurt, inbreed, inlay, keep, kneel, know, knit, lay, lie, lean, learn, lead, leave, lend, leap, let, light, lose, make, mean, meet, mow, pay, plead, prove, put, quit, run, ring, read, rid, ride, rise, say, sing, sink, sit, see, saw, send, set, sew, shave, shear, shed, shoe, shine, shake, shoot, show, shrink, shut, sleep, slay, slide, slit, sling, slink, smell, smite, sneak, sell, seek, sow, speed, spell, spend, spill, spit, split, spoil, speak, spring, spread, spin, stink, steal, stand, strew, stride, strive, strike, string, stick, sting, sublet, swim, sweat, swell, sweep, swear, swing, teach, think, throw, thrive, thrust, tell, take, tear, tread, be, wed, go, weep, wake, win, wear, wind, weave, write, and wring. Irregular English Verbs Activator


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Irregular F Plurals

What I call irregular F plurals are nouns that end in the /f/ sound and are irregular plurals. Words like leaf, wife, and wolf. Not all nouns that end in /f/ are irregular plurals, however. Words like gulf, turf, and clef are regular plurals. Regular plurals in English simply add an S to the noun. Boy become boys, girl becomes girls, and lesson becomes lessons. Irregular plurals don’t do this. Some words that end in the /f/ sound, form the plural using ves. Of the irregular F plurals, leaf becomes leaves, knife becomes knives, and wolf becomes wolves. Notice that knife ends in FE but has the /f/ sound.


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