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All 257 Lessons Alphabetically Listed.

There are currently 257 British English lessons in the Britlish Library and I regularly add new lessons. The grid below shows you the 257 lessons available arranged alphabetically from A to Z. Use the navigation buttons to look through them. If you want to concentrate on a particular area of English, choose the category view instead.


New-Old Cat Top Rand IPA

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Its or It's

It's a source of great confusion to both natives and non natives alike when writing its and it's. This lesson will explain how to know which one to use and why it's needed. It's got questions to help you practice, too. Learn when to use it's as the contracted form of it is or it has, and when to use its as the possessive adjective.


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Its or It's Conversation Simulation

In this lesson, we will look at some common mistakes that even native English speakers make when it comes to using its and it's. Learn how to use these correctly and you will never again make the common mistakes that make you look not quite as proficient at English as you might like to look.


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Just for Laughs 1

I’ve chosen 7 short British English jokes for this lesson. These 7 English jokes will help you understand English humour and improve your vocabulary. English humour can be difficult for non-native English speakers. This is why simple English jokes are a very good way of teaching vocabulary, and why  They will also show you how British English humour depends on word play, puns, and pronunciation, as well as the multiple meanings of some English words. There are exercises to go with each joke which will help you to really understand there the humour comes from. By mastering English humour, you will be developing your English skills in an enjoyable and memorable way. 


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Knackered - Vocabulary Activator

Just as Eskimos have many words for snow, apparently, so, too, do the British, wearied by overwork, have many words for being tired such as drained, exhausted, fatigued, knackered, spent, tired out and worn out. This lesson will help you to learn, remember, and use these words without becoming exhausted in the process.


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Leg Idioms

Learn some common British English idioms in this video English lesson from Britlish. The idioms are: Tail between your legs, On its last legs, Get a leg up, Pulling your leg, Shake a leg, Break a leg, Not have a leg to stand on, Stretch your legs, Legwork, and Sea legs. This lesson is part of the Body Idioms series of idioms lessons.


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Level Test - 100 Questions

This 100-question test will give you a reasonable indication of your current level of English. Whatever your level, the Britlish Library lessons will help you to improve it quickly. How to Read Your Results Take the test and complete all 100 questions. Your score will reflect your level: 0 to 35 means you are pre-intermediate or lower (A1 to A2) 36 to 50 means you are intermediate (B1) 51 to 85 means you are upper intermediate (B2) 85 to 100 means you are advanced or higher (C1 to C2)


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Library - Syncope

The word library is one of the words that students try very hard to pronounce properly, yet still get wrong. Other words like family, vegetable, chocolate, natural, favourite, medicine, general, and many more are also syncopated when we speak at a normal, fast-spoken rate. Many students initially refuse to believe that a word they have been pronouncing with three syllables all their life can be, and indeed, normally is, pronounced with just two syllables. Perhaps you are one of these students? If you are, prepare to be shocked and amazed by this lesson.


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Linking Consonants - An Introduction

An introduction to linking consonants in British English. Linking consonants occur when a consonant at the end of a word is followed by a vowel sound during the unbroken sound stream within a speech segment. This lesson explains how linking consonants work, gives examples of sentences containing linking consonants and examines why each linking consonant happens, and then moves on to activate your ability to hear the linking consonants in sentences. By understanding how linking consonants work, you will improve your listening skills, too.


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Linking Sounds - An Introduction

Whether you are English, Chinese, Polynesian, Russian, or any other nationality, you share the same anatomy as me. This anatomy, in terms of our vocal tract, limits the sounds that we can easily say in a sentence. Of the two types of sounds in English, consonants and vowels, we cannot easily say two vowel sounds one after the other. Linking sounds bridge the gap between such difficult-to-say combinations of sounds. There are three linking sounds in English: the linking W, the linking J, and the linking R. This lesson will help you to see and hear how linking sounds work and how they can help you to improve not only your accent but also your listening skills.


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Lip Idioms

Learn some common British English idioms with this lesson from Britlish. The idioms are: Pay lip service, Lick your lips, Bite your lip, Give someone lip, My lips are sealed, Smack lips, Slip of the lip, Tight-lipped, Lock lips, Pass my lips, Stiff upper lip, A bit lippy, Read my lips, Loose lips, Button your lip, and On everyone’s lips. This lesson is part of the Body Idioms series at Britlish.com.


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