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All 227 Lessons Alphabetically Listed.

There are currently 227 British English lessons in the Britlish Library and I add new lessons every week. The grid below shows you the 227 lessons available arranged alphabetically from A to Z. Use the navigation buttons to look through them. If you want to concentrate on a particular area of English, choose the category view instead.

13 British English Lesson Categories

I have categorised the lessons in the Britlish library into the following categories: English in Use lessons, Exams and Tests lessons, Grammar lessons, Humour lessons, Idioms lessons, Information lessons, Literature lessons, Phrasal Verbs lessons, Sounds British Pronunciation lessons, Spelling lessons, Vocabulary lessons, Writing lessons, Sounds Rude lessons, and more.

You can select all of the lessons in each of the categories by clicking on any of the images or links below.


Chronological List Categories Random Lesson

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Idioms Activation Pack - Arms

There are 13 arms idioms in this Idiom Activation Pack. To be up in arms, Have one arm tied behind your back, Cost an arm and a leg, Lay down your arms, Strong-arm tactics, Keep somebody at arm’s length, Have a list as long as your arm, To give your right arm, Welcome someone with open arms, The long arm of the law, Twist someone’s arm, Chance your arm, and To bear arms. After you have seen, heard, and read the idioms and their meanings, you can activate them and make them part of your active vocabulary. You can do this by using the Idioms Activator which I have designed to give you plenty of practice in listening, reading, and writing the idioms you have learnt in this Idiom Activation Pack. These Idiom Activation Packs are designed to help you activate your English skills. I have been helping students learn, remember, and use the all-important idiomatic expressions for many years and now I want to reach many more students by using the latest technology. I have designed this Idiom Activation Pack to make learning British English idioms as easy and enjoyable as possible. Idioms Activation Pack - Arms


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In a Jiffy

Learn the phrase "in a Jiffy" in just a few minutes. This conversation simulation will help you to see just how we use the common English phrase, in a jiffy. A conversation simulation is the closest you can get to a real live conversation with a native English speaker. You will hear how a native English speaker might respond to a series of questions or statements and can practice your own speaking when working your way through this conversation. Conversations simulations are created using the latest e-learning technology and can give you a learning experience unlike anything you can find in a book, and quite unlike most of the material you find on other English learning websites.  


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In a Row

To say that things are in a row means that they are arranged in a line next to one another either in space or time. By extension, the idiomatic expression, in a row, means that several events happen consecutively, one after the other. This lesson will help you to use this common expression. We need to be careful with the word row, however, as it has several meanings and even different pronunciation. The first meaning is a noun meaning an arrangement of objects side by side in a line as in a row of books on the shelf. The second meaning is a verb meaning to propel a boat using oars as in he rowed the rowing boat across the lake. The third meaning is a noun and verb meaning to have an angry dispute as in he had a row with his wife about his drinking.


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Influenza and Illness

In today’s virus-ravaged world, it is important to learn the language you need to speak about viruses and illness. This lesson will give you all the information you need. It’s based on a video English lesson I made in 2011 when I came down with flu. I thought I should revisit it during the Great Lockdown of 2020. After watching the videos, do the quiz to practice what you have learnt.


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Into, In To, In

The problem of using in to, or into is a problem that even native speakers of English face. It’s a problem because in spoken English there is no difference in pronunciation between the two. Nevertheless, both into and in to have different meanings which are important in written English. In this lesson I’ll explain the differences and help you to get them right. If you're ready to dive into this lesson, click the link below.


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aprendre anglès britànic | naučit se britskou angličtinu | õppida Suurbritannia inglise keelt | lerne britisches Englisch | imparare l'inglese britannico | išmokti britų anglų kalbos | lære britisk engelsk | учить британский английский | aprender inglés británico | బ్రిటిష్ ఇంగ్లీష్ నేర్చుకోండి | برطانوی انگریزی سیکھیں | เรียนรู้ภาษาอังกฤษแบบอังกฤษ | lära sig brittisk engelska | научите британски енглески | uczyć się brytyjskiego angielskiego | belajar Bahasa Inggeris Inggeris | イギリス英語を学ぶ | μάθετε Αγγλικά Αγγλικά | matuto ng British English | lære britisk engelsk | 学习英式英语 | تعلم الإنجليزية البريطانية | ব্রিটিশ ইংরেজি শিখুন | 學習英式英語 | leer Brits Engels | oppia englannin englantia | ללמוד אנגלית בריטית | 영국 영어 배우기 | ബ്രിട്ടീഷ് ഇംഗ്ലീഷ് പഠിക്കുക | aprender inglês britânico | naučiť sa britskú angličtinu | англисии бритониёиро омӯзед | İngiliz İngilizcesi öğrenmek | học tiếng anh Anh | вивчати британську англійську | பிரிட்டிஷ் ஆங்கிலம் கற்க | naučite se britanske angleščine | invata engleza britanica | ब्रिटिश इंग्रजी शिका | mācīties britu angļu valodu | belajar bahasa Inggris British | apprendre l'anglais britannique | lerni britan anglan | naučiti britanski engleski | научете британски английски