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All 257 Lessons Alphabetically Listed.

There are currently 257 British English lessons in the Britlish Library and I regularly add new lessons. The grid below shows you the 257 lessons available arranged alphabetically from A to Z. Use the navigation buttons to look through them. If you want to concentrate on a particular area of English, choose the category view instead.


New-Old Cat Top Rand IPA

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Political Correctness

Political correctness or PC is a term used to describe language designed not to cause offence to members of a particular group in society. The term is usually used to imply that the language is unwarranted and unnecessary. Political correctness extends beyond language to government policies and measures which are supposed to be more inclusive towards those traditionally discriminated against. This lesson will introduce you to some of the thinking behind political correctness as well as to some of the language that is now deemed to be politically correct.


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Prepositions of Place

Activate your use of prepositions of place. A preposition of place is a preposition that we use to refer to the place where a person or object is located. The prepositions of place include above, across, against, along, among, around, at, behind, below, beside, between, by, close to, down, from, in front of, inside, in, into, near, next to, off, on, onto, opposite, out of, outside, over, past, round, through, to, towards, under, and up, and this lesson looks at the most common of them and shows the student of English how to use them correctly.    


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Present Continuous - GA4

I told you about the past and present tenses in Grammar Activation Pack 1. I also introduced you to the aspects – simple, continuous, and perfect, and showed you why the three key verbs, do, be, and have, are so important. In Grammar Activation Packs 2 and 3, I looked at the Present and Past tense of the simple aspect. In this Grammar Activation Pack, I am going to tell you how the second of the key verbs, be, is used for the continuous aspect, present tense. The continuous aspect is marked by the auxiliary verb be plus an ing form of a non-finite verb. There are 5 finite inflected forms of the verb be: am, is, are, and was, were. You already know that the inflected forms of be, am, is, and are, mark the present tense and that the inflected forms of be, was, and were, mark the past tense. In this Grammar Activation Pack, I will be looking at the present tense, continuous aspect. I will look at the past tense, continuous aspect in the next pack. This British English grammar is essential for all students of English and the many exercises in the pack will help you master it quickly and enjoyably.    


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Present Perfect - GA6

I explained about the Key Verbs, be, do, and have and their inflected tenses in Grammar Activation Pack 1. I have looked at the simple and continuous aspects, both present and past tense in Grammar Activation Packs 2 to 5. In this Grammar Activation Pack, I am going to tell you how the third of the key verbs, have, is used for the perfect aspect, present tense. When a form of the verb have is not followed by a past participle it is acting as a main verb, not an auxiliary verb and the perfect aspect is not formed. We only have the perfect aspect if one of the inflected forms of have comes before a past participle. This British English grammar is essential for all students of English and the many exercises in the pack will help you master it quickly and enjoyably.


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Present Perfect Continuous - GA9

The perfect aspect of the present tense is marked by the auxiliary verb have plus the past participle. Remember that the tenses are shown by the auxiliary verbs, be, do, and have. If we have the present tense of have followed by a past participle, we have present perfect. So, if have plus a past participle gives us the perfect aspect, and be +ing gives us the continuous aspect, then together we should get the perfect continuous aspect. Well, it’s easy enough to name the aspects and the tenses, but you may be wondering how, when, and where we should use the perfect continuous aspect. In this Grammar Activation Pack we will look at the present tense, perfect continuous aspect. The very name of the structure tells us a lot about it. The present tense tells us there is a connection with the present, that is, now. The perfect aspect uses the past participle which shows a connection to the past. The continuous aspect talks about something happening over a period of time; in this case from a time in the past to the present. This British English grammar is essential for all students of English and the many exercises in the pack will help you master it quickly and enjoyably.    


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Present Perfect Past - Present - GA7

We can talk about finished actions using both the present perfect and the past simple. It’s logical that anything which is finished must be in the past. What the present perfect does that the past simple cannot do is to form a connection between the past finished action and the present. We can only use a finished time expression like last week with the past simple. In this Grammar Activation Pack, I want to focus on how the present perfect connects events in the past with the present. As I said, logically anything that is finished must have happened in the past. The present perfect uses the present tense of the finite verb have, which as you know is have or has, and the past participle of a non-finite verb. It is this combination of the present and the past that gives us our biggest clue as to how the perfect aspect and the present tense work together. This British English grammar is essential for all students of English and the many exercises in the pack will help you master it quickly and enjoyably.


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Present Perfect Time Markers - GA8

English uses time markers to accurately say when something happened or happens. Yesterday, last week, last month, last year, and many more expressions tell us the when of an action. We cannot use the above finished time markers with the present perfect because they show finished periods of time. We use these time markers with the past simple. We cannot use finished time markers like yesterday, and last year with the present perfect, but there are 4 time markers that we can use. Allow me to explain how we can use these time markers with the present perfect. This British English grammar is essential for all students of English and the many exercises in the pack will help you master it quickly and enjoyably.    


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Present Simple - GA2

I told you about the past and present tenses in Grammar Activation Pack 1. I also introduced you to the aspects – simple, continuous, and perfect, and showed you why the three key verbs, do, be, and have, are so important. In this Grammar Activation Pack, I am going to tell you about the first of these key verbs, do, and how it is used for the simple aspect, present tense. The simple aspect of the present tense is marked by the auxiliary verb do, even when it appears to be missing. You might want to refresh your memory of the hidden do by taking another look at Grammar Activation Pack 1. The present tense of the verb do is used for the subjects, I, we, you, and they. When we use the gender specific, third person, singular subject pronouns, he, and she, we use does. This British English grammar is essential for all students of English and the many exercises in the pack will help you master it quickly and enjoyably.


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Question Tags

Question tags are short questions placed at the end of statements in informal writing and normal speech, and they are used to indicate that we want some information or that we want confirmation of something we believe to be the case. Usually we use positive question tags with negative statements and negative question tags with positive statement. We can, however, use positive with positive in some circumstances to express our feelings. This lesson will tell you everything you need to know about question tags, won't it?  


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Recommend

Rocío from Spain, and several other students, have asked me to recommend the best ways to use the word recommend. The verb recommend is used to offer suggestions as to what to do or where to go. We recommend things to others based on our personal experiences. I recommend that you do this lesson and see how we use this verb and I recommend that you take a look at this lesson if you have trouble using the verb recommend.   


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