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All 230 Lessons Alphabetically Listed.

There are currently 230 British English lessons in the Britlish Library and I regularly add new lessons. The grid below shows you the 230 lessons available arranged alphabetically from A to Z. Use the navigation buttons to look through them. If you want to concentrate on a particular area of English, choose the category view instead.

13 British English Lesson Categories

I have categorised the lessons in the Britlish library into the following categories: English in Use lessons, Exams and Tests lessons, Grammar lessons, Humour lessons, Idioms lessons, Information lessons, Literature lessons, Phrasal Verbs lessons, Sounds British Pronunciation lessons, Spelling lessons, Vocabulary lessons, Writing lessons, Sounds Rude lessons, and more.

You can select all of the lessons in each of the categories by clicking on any of the images or links below.


Chronological List Categories Random Lesson IPA Chart

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Comfy, Comfier, Comfiest

Comfortable is not an easy word to say, is it? While comfortable only has 3 syllables, many students try to use 4. Comfortable is so uncomfortable a word to pronounce that in 1829 someone decided that it might be better to use only the first syllable and a -y suffix. The informal word comfy was born and what an improvement, I’m sure you’ll agree. Comfy is a comfy word to pronounce, isn’t it? Let’s see how we use comfy in conversation, shall we?


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Commas - Punctuation for Students

Oscar Wilde, a great British writer, once admitted to spending an entire morning removing a comma from a poem. Asked if that was all he had done, Wilde replied, “By no means: on mature reflection, I put back the comma.” If a great writer like Oscar Wilde had difficulty in deciding where and when to use a comma, what chance have the rest of us got? In this lesson I will teach you about the history of the comma and about how to use it. You will learn about clauses, ambiguity, the Oxford comma, question tags, coordinating conjunctions, coordinate adjectives, dates, and more. Do this lesson and you will be more confident in your ability to use the comma in your written English.


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Connected Speech

Learn about pronunciation in connected speech and how it can lead to missed or added sounds. When students begin to learn English, they learn words in isolation. Teachers drill their students to pronounce individual words as though these words will always sound the same. Yet, words are seldom heard in isolation, and are usually produced in a stream of sound. In the stream of sound, words join together, and interesting things happen where one word meets another word. In this lesson, we will try to identify what added information we can hear in sentences. We will also try to hear what information is missing in sentences. Noticing how your speech differs will help you to correct the way you speak to sound more English. Connected Speech.  


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Countable and Uncountable Nouns

I made a lot of video English lessons in 2010 as part of my Daily Dose of English series. Unfortunately, they never became quite as popular as I hoped they would. Nevertheless, they were interesting and relevant then and they remain so today. I have taken a video English lesson about countable and uncountable nouns and have turned it into this Britlish Library lesson. The technology I now use for my lessons allows me to explore the subject of countable and uncountable nouns in much greater detail than a simple video English lesson allows. Try this more active way of learning and see how countable and uncountable nouns really work. You will also learn about definite and indefinite articles.


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CPE Reading and Use of English Activator 1

The Cambridge Proficiency Exam (CPE) reading and use of English is a set of 7 questions from the full CPE exam for which students are given 90 minutes to complete the exam. I have created an example exam using the same format as in the CPE and you can do a full, reading and use of English exam timed for 90 minutes to help you get used to planning your time wisely in the actual exam. You can also do parts 1-4, part 5, part 6, and part 7, separately as untimed tests if you just want to practice the exam technique. Each of the tests in this activator will give you immediate feedback on your score and show you where you might have made mistakes. There are 53 questions in total in the Reading and Use of English part of the CPE and you can score a maximum of 72 points. These tests reflect the official Cambridge scoring system.


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