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162 Vocabulary British English Lessons

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be.

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10 of our 162 Vocabulary British English Lessons

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Snake

Snake is one of D. H. Lawrence's most famous poems and was published in the poetry collection Birds, Beasts and Flowers. I use this poem in this lesson to help you with your pronunciation, your vocabulary, your understanding of the British English IPA chart symbols, and to introduce you to this most beautiful of poems. Poems are a great way to enrich many aspects of your English and I hope that you enjoy the poem and the exercises included in the lesson.


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Socrates - Famous Men of Ancient Times

In 1843, a man by the name of Samuel Griswold Goodrich wrote and published a book called Famous Men of Ancient Times. In the book, Goodrich looked at the lives of Mohammed, Belisarius, Attila, Nero, Seneca, Virgil, Cicero, Julius Cæsar, Hannibal, Alexander, Aristotle, Demosthenes, Apelles, Diogenes, Plato, Socrates, Alcibiades, Democritus, Pericles, Aristides, Æsop, Solon, Lycurgus, Homer, and Confucius. I chose to make his chapter on Socrates the subject of the video English lesson and Vocabulary Activation Pack here.


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Somewhere to Sit

In this lesson you will be looking at the following vocabulary: a degree of, ablutions, ample, back-seat driver, bums on seats, by the seat of your pants, castor, couch potato, crap, dearth, euphemistically, frame, have a seat, in the driving seat, in the hot seat, ingest, keep my seat warm, lazing, lethargic, lose yourself in something, on the edge of your seat, piece of furniture, plonked, propel, quilted, ringside seat, sluggish, sumptuous, take a back seat, take a seat, take the weight off your feet, tempted, throne, and upholstered.


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Sonnet 18

The most famous and well-known of Shakespeare's 154 sonnets is undoubtedly Sonnet 18 which begins, Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? This lesson looks at the pronunciation of the sonnet as well as providing a modern English translation of the sonnet to make it easier to understand. The lesson also looks at some of the old, obsolete language of Shakespeare, in particular the thee, thy, thou which appear in this sonnet. There is a full British English IPA phonetic transcript of the sonnet, too, to help students improve their knowledge and use of the 44 IPA symbols in British English.


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Sounds British - Word Stress

Learn about and practice syllables and word stress. In this Pronunciation Activation Pack, we are going to practice hearing the correct stress in English words. First, we will practice counting the syllables in words. Then, we will practice hearing where the main stress is in words. Finally, we will look at a comedy sketch which shows what happens when you mispronounce English words. Sounds British - Word Stress


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Sounds Rude - Body Parts

This lesson is the first of a planned Sounds Rude course and looks at Body Parts. If you don’t know your bum from your fanny, or your tadger from your dick, then you really need to study this first course. A lot of humour in English movies and television, as well as books and other media, uses this language for comedic effect. The Body Parts lesson looks at general body parts common to both sexes, the body parts specific to men, and the body parts specific to women. The images in the course are uncensored. Not all rude words are equally rude. Some are mildly rude and can be used in most situations, but others are so rude that you should never use them at all.


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Spelling Skills Development

English spelling is notoriously difficult, even for native English speakers. Very often, the letters used to spell the word and the pronunciation of the word differ greatly. It can be embarrassing to make spelling errors in emails or other correspondence. Such spelling mistakes can damage your career prospects. I designed this English Activation Pack to activate your English spelling skills. For students who are taking English exams, a lot of spelling mistakes can have a detrimental effect on your overall score. In the writing part of the exam, you will lose valuable marks for spelling mistakes. In the listening part of the exam, you will lose valuable marks if you can’t understand how words are spelt. I have created this English Activation Pack to help you avoid spelling mistakes for over 180 words in English and in your exams.


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Take Phrasal Verbs and Idioms

There are a lot of British English idioms which use the verb take and this lesson will help you to learn, remember, and use the most common ones including, take a bath, take a break, take a bullet, take a chance on, take a dim view, take a firm stance, take a gander, take a hike, take a joke, take a leaf out of, take a load off, take a lot of stick, take a pew, take a running jump, take a step back, take a swing at, take after, take as it comes, take a backseat, take your breath away, take a breather, take a trip down memory lane, take your eyes off, take a fancy to, take for a spin, take for a fool, take for granted, take to heart, and take with a pinch of salt.


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Talk about the Weather

How to talk about the weather in English using a video lecture and some self-test questions to help you learn. This lesson also looks at some English idioms related to weather and will help with your listening skills and your pronunciation. If you want to learn how to talk about the weather in English, you need to do this lesson.


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Taste of Your Own Medicine

We have many idioms in English. One of them is a taste of your own medicine. This common idiom has its roots in Ancient Rome. Gaius Julius Phaedrus lived in the 1st century and translated the fables of Aesop into Latin. He also wrote many fables of his own in the style of Aesop, one of which is the source of the English idiom we are looking at in this lesson.


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10 of our 162 Vocabulary British English Lessons


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