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17 Speaking British English Lessons

It's not easy to teaching speaking skills remotely through a website, however good the site is. To really practice your speaking skills, you need someone to speak to who can correct your mistakes as you go. The lessons here will go some way to helping you to improve your speaking skills by helping you to mirror the speech you hear in the lesson. In this way, you can notice how your speech differs from that in the lesson and, by recording your own speech, you can adjust your pronunciation to more accurately match that in the lesson.

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7 of our 17 Speaking British English Lessons

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Syllabic Consonants -ism

-ism is a suffix appended to the end of many English words. It means taking sides with or imitation of. Pronunciation-wise, -ism has a syllabic consonant /m/ at the end. In this lesson, we’ll look at how we pronounce some common isms. The -isms include, ageism, asceticism, atheism, Buddhism, capitalism, communism, Cubism, Druidism, dualism, Expressionism, Judaism, racism, Romanticism, sexism, and socialism.


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Syllabic Consonants in Words Ending *LE

A syllabic consonant is a consonant that is pronounced as a syllable. The two main syllabic consonants in English are /l/ or /n/ sounds. The /l/ syllabic consonant occurs at the end of the word bottle, while the /n/ occurs in words like listen. Syllabic consonants occur mainly in the final syllable of words. In this lesson, we will look at the 11 possible letter combinations that can result in a final-syllable /l/ syllabic consonant: a syllable which has a consonant not a vowel as the peak. I have chosen one word for each of the following endings which produce a syllable consonant: -ble, -cle, -dle, -fle, -gle, -kle, -ple, -sle, -tle, -xle, and -zle. Some of these combinations have many examples, while others have few. There are no other -*le endings in English words which produce the /l/ syllabic consonant.


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Talk about the Weather

How to talk about the weather in English using a video lecture and some self-test questions to help you learn. This lesson also looks at some English idioms related to weather and will help with your listening skills and your pronunciation. If you want to learn how to talk about the weather in English, you need to do this lesson.


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Teen or Ty Numbers

In this lesson: We will look at how to distinguish between teen and ty numbers. We will look at the stress patterns in words. We will look at stress shifts in English words. We will look at making syllables prominent for effect. Whether it's thirty or thirteen, forty or fourteen, fifty or fifteen, or anywhere up to ninety or nineteen, this lesson will help you to make sure you never make a mistake with these numbers.


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The Glottal Stop

This lesson will tell you what a glottal stop is and then tell you how to use it. A glottal stop is also known as the voiceless glottal plosive and it’s used in many languages besides English. In fact, you probably use it without being aware of it. The glottal stop is called the glottal stop because the sound is made when the vocal cords close and stop the flow of air. The gap between the vocal cords is called the glottis. The glottal stop is also known as the voiceless glottal plosive, which means their air flow is obstructed between the lungs and the mouth by the closing of the vocal cords. The most pronounced use of the glottal stop can be found in Cockney English where the glottal stop replaces the /p/, the /t/, and the /k/ sounds when they are preceded by a stressed vowel sound and are followed by an unstressed vowel sound.


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The Weak Was

In normal fast-spoken speech some words are not prominent, and we only hear the strong form of these words in certain circumstances. The words that we normally only hear the weak form of include was, as well as the other forms of the verb to be: is, am, are, and were. The children’s rhyme, Fuzzy Wuzzy Was a Bear, shows how these weak forms are necessary for the correct pronunciation and rhythm of English.


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Travel English - Hotel English

In this English Activation Pack, we will be looking at the language you need when staying, or even working, in a hotel in an English-speaking country. If you travel abroad, you probably stay in hotels. To have a successful stay, you need to know how to reserve a room at the hotel, how to check-in and how to check out, and how to deal with any problems you may have while at the hotel. In this English Activation Pack you will learn all the language you need for your stay in an English-speaking hotel. This English Activation Pack contains 5 Conversation Simulations to activate your English and give you all the language and practice you need for your hotel stay. Travel English - Hotel English    


First Previous

7 of our 17 Speaking British English Lessons


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