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162 Vocabulary British English Lessons

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be.

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10 of our 162 Vocabulary British English Lessons

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Both, Either, and Neither

The three words, both, either, and neither, are very important in English, but they are confusing for both native speakers and students alike. In this Vocabulary Activation Pack, I will show you how to use these three word correctly. They are not very difficult to use once you get the hang of them. The difficulty lies in the fact that either and neither sound very much alike, but are opposite in meaning. Work your way through this Activation Pack and complete the 15 exercises in the Vocabulary Activator and you will no longer have trouble with this vocabulary.


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Bottom Idioms

The 12 common British English idiomatic expressions are, at the bottom of the ladder, learn something from the bottom up, to be at the bottom of something, the bottom of the barrel, bottoms up, the bottom line, smooth as a baby's bottom, from top to bottom, the bottom drawer, to hit rock bottom, from the bottom of my heart, and the bottom fell out of. This British English idioms lesson will help to you learn, remember, and use 12 common British English idiomatic expressions which use the word bottom. 


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Bring and Take

Bring and Take are two verbs which cause problems for many students. I believe this is because there are so many idiomatic expressions which use bring and take. At the request of my student, Monica, I have made this English Activation Pack to settle your doubts once and for all. Work your way through the theory part and then activate your English with the Activation Quizzes. The Activation Quizzes contain many sentence transformation, or key word transformations exercises. The English Activation Pack also has embedded audio throughout to help with your pronunciation.


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Bring Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

There are a lot of British English expressions that use the verb bring and they include, bring round, bring before, bring down a peg, bring home the bacon, bring in from the cold, bring into disrepute, bring into service, bring into view, bring out in droves, bring out the best, bring out the worst, bring the curtain down, bring to a close, bring to a head, bring to a standstill, bring to account, bring to bear, bring to book, bring to heel, bring to knees, bring to life, bring to mind, bring to senses, bring to the boil, bring to the test, bring under control, bring up, bring up on charges, bring up the read, bring up to date, and bring up to speed.


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Bring, Fetch, Get, Take

I’d like to thank Monica, in Italy, for requesting this lesson. The verbs, bring, fetch, get, and take, cause confusion for many students of English. Part of the confusion arises from the fact that these verbs all seem to be fairly similar in meaning. The verbs all describe the action of moving an object from one place to another. What you need to do when using these verbs is to consider where the object being moved is in relation to yourself and others.  


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Buttercup

A lot of jokes in English depend for their humour on the way completely different words can sound identical due to the speech features we find in spoken British English. This is one of those jokes. Listen to the joke and then do the exercises so that you can learn about why it is so funny. English humour can be difficult for non-native English speakers. This is why simple English jokes are a very good way of teaching vocabulary, and why I’ve chosen a very simple joke for this lesson. I’m not going to write the joke here as it depends for its humour entirely on a homophone.       


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Butterfly - An Experiment in AI

GPT-3 is a neural network created by OpenAI which uses an autoregressive language model and deep learning to produce text that is indistinguishable from that produced by a human being. I decided to pose a question to the GPT-3 AI to test its capabilities. The question I posed to the AI was: What does it feel like to be a butterfly? The answer I got back was interesting, to say the least. I used Amazon Polly, another neural net AI, to read aloud the GPT-3 AI’s answer. I then fed the audio file into an AI animation software package which created a recognisable character that could present the AI generated answer to you on the screen. The following video is the result. Bear in mind that everything you see and hear was created by artificial intelligence. All I did was add some eye-candy in the form of the caterpillar and butterfly videos in the background.


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Cat and Dog Idioms

In this lesson we are going to look at some idioms and fixed expressions that mention cats and dogs including, a dog's life, dog eat dog, dog-eared, fight like cats and dogs, go to the dogs, have kittens, in the doghouse, let sleeping dogs lie, let the cat out of the bag, make a dog's dinner of something, no room to swing a cat, play cat and mouse, and raining cats and dogs.


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Cheek, Chest, Chin Idioms

The 7 idioms are, turn the other cheek, tongue in cheek, cheek by jowl, get something off your chest, keep something close to your chest, take it on the chin, and keep your chin up. This British English idioms lesson will help to you learn, remember, and use 7 common British English idiomatic expressions which use the words cheek, chest, and chin. 


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Chicken Idioms

Chickens have always been an important part of British life since the first were introduced to the island during the pre-Roman Iron Age. Romans made them more popular as a food source, particularly for egg production, after Claudius invaded Britain in the first century AD. Today, chickens are the most widespread livestock animal not only in the world but also in Britain. Because of their importance, there are several common idioms associated with chickens in English and we will look at them in detail in this lesson. The idioms include: flock together, come home to roost, pecking order, fly the coop, henpecked, and rule the roost.


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10 of our 162 Vocabulary British English Lessons


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