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99 Pronunciation British English Lessons

No matter how good your English grammar and vocabulary may be, if your pronunciation is so bad that nobody can understand a word you say, then you are at a grave disadvantage in regards to your English. These lessons have been designed to help you to improve your pronunciation, as well as other areas of your English.

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10 of our 99 Pronunciation British English Lessons

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Food and Drink Collocations

Collocations are ground of words which normally go together such as paint a picture. To say make a picture or do a picture sound strange to native English speakers. If you use the correct collocations when speaking or writing in English, you will sound much more natural and much more like a native British English speaker. This lesson looks at some common collocations to do with food and eating. Makes notes of the new vocabulary in your personal Study Record which you will find on each lesson page in the Britlish Library. This language is very useful for students who plan to take exams. This is one of the five-minute collocations series of lessons and should take you about 5 minutes to complete.


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Function and Content Words

An explanation of function and content words in English. The difference between function and content words is one of the key factors in English sentence stress and the rhythm of English. This lesson help you to better understand them. I’ve used the terms function and content words several times in this course up to now. I thought it was a good time to tell you what they are. Function words are also known as structure words, grammatical words, grammatical functors, grammatical morphemes, function morphemes, form words, and empty words. That list will give you a good idea of what they are.


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Fur or Fir - Homophones

The two words fur and fir are homophones in English and cause a lot of pronunciation confusion for students. I mean, how can two words that are radically different have exactly the same sound? There are many homophones in English and this lesson is designed to help you master these two. Not only does it deal with the words fir and fur, but it also deals with words like furred, furry, furlike, furl, furlong, furlough, furnace, furniture, furore, further, fury, fire, firkin, firm, first, fifth, and firth. This lesson will help you to pronounce all of these words perfectly.


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Futility

Futility is one of the most famous poems by one of the most famous poets of World War I, Wilfred Owen, 1893-1918. This poem tells us of an incident where a group of soldiers try to revive an unconscious soldier by dragging him into the sun on a snowy day, but their efforts are in vain because the soldier is already dead. I use this poem in this lesson to help you with your pronunciation, your vocabulary, your understanding of the British English IPA chart symbols, and to introduce you to this most beautiful of poems. Poems are a great way to enrich many aspects of your English and I hope that you enjoy the poem and the exercises included in the lesson.


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Greetings - Conversation Activator

Practice how to greet someone with this conversation activator which will also teach you some useful vocabulary and expressions. This English Conversation Activation Pack gives you practicing in greeting people you meet for the first time. Expressions such as, Hi, Nice to meet you, Good morning, Pleased to meet you, Are you here on…, as well as showing you how not to greet people and how to avoid sounding rude or worse. You will also learn some new expressions and vocabulary such as: abrupt, architect, break the ice, Christopher Wren, come across as, decent, do you fancy, go out for, going nowhere, gorgeous, hold something against someone, Holland, in banking, intrusive, look good on, Lothario, lovely, married, miss the chance, motive, museum, on business, perhaps, pervert, plan on, pub, reception, something in common, St Paul’s Cathedral, suspicious, take someone out, weirdo, and What brings you here?      


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High Flight

This most famous of poems about flying is mostly known and remembered for the first and last lines: Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of Earth, Put out my hand, and touched the face of God. I use this poem in this lesson to help you with your pronunciation, your vocabulary, your understanding of the British English IPA chart symbols, and to introduce you to this most beautiful of poems. Poems are a great way to enrich many aspects of your English and I hope that you enjoy the poem and the exercises included in the lesson.


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Homophones and Homonyms

If we look at the words homophone and homonym we see that they both start with homo which means same. In the last part of homophone, phone means sound and in homonym, nym means name. Homophone means words that have the same sound but different meanings. There are several hundred homophones in English. Homonym means words that are written the same, but have different meanings, and maybe different pronunciations. This lesson uses many of my video English lessons to show you how homophones and homonyms are used, and also has some exercises to give you some practice of some of the common ones.  


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Huge - Hard to Say

The word huge is a hard word to spell and to pronounce. In this lesson I’ll tell you what huge means, show you how to pronounce it with a standard British English accent, and give you some examples of its use. I’ll also look at other vocabulary of size adjectives such as colossal, diddy, diminutive, enormous, gigantic, ginormous, huge, immense, large, lilliputian, mammoth, massive, mega, microscopic, mini, minute, petite, prodigious, puny, teeny, tiddly, tiny, titanic, and vast. You can also practice your knowledge of the IPA symbols and pronunciation with some IPA transcriptions of these size adjectives.


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I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud

The lyric poem, I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud, also commonly known as Daffodils, is Wordsworth’s most famous poem. I have designed this lesson as a way of showing you the rhythm of English. Because of their structure, poems like this one are a very useful way of demonstrating the typical rhythm of the English language. In this lesson you will first listen to the poem, then read it, and then explore the phonetic transcription. It also includes a biography of William Wordsworth, the poet, as well as the background to the writing of the poem. Finally, you will have the chance to test how much you have learned about stress patterns and rhymes in some interactive exercises.


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If-

The poem, If-, by Rudyard Kipling was written around 1895, shortly after the birth of Kipling’s son, John. The poem is an example of Victorian stoicism and takes the form of the author’s paternal advice to his son. John Kipling was reported as wounded and missing in 1915 while serving as a Lieutenant during World War I, a post his father had secured him thanks to his social connections and despite his son’s severe myopia. His grave was not identified until 1992. You can read this poem in Latin script and in IPA script as well as listen to me read it for you.


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10 of our 99 Pronunciation British English Lessons


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