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47 English in Use British English Lessons

The lessons categorised as English in Use look at the way we use English in everyday life. The lessons cover the actual use of English and examine grammar, punctuation, and functionality of the language. For any student studying English as a second language or English as a foreign language, English in Use lessons are particularly useful for improving speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills. These lessons will help you to develop your confidence in using different types of text such as fiction, newspapers and magazines, as well as learning to speak and write about things such as the weather and travel, as well as preparing you for typical situations such as ordering in a restaurant or buying a train ticket.

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10 of our 47 English in Use British English Lessons

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Sounds Rude - Body Parts

This lesson is the first of a planned Sounds Rude course and looks at Body Parts. If you don’t know your bum from your fanny, or your tadger from your dick, then you really need to study this first course. A lot of humour in English movies and television, as well as books and other media, uses this language for comedic effect. The Body Parts lesson looks at general body parts common to both sexes, the body parts specific to men, and the body parts specific to women. The images in the course are uncensored. Not all rude words are equally rude. Some are mildly rude and can be used in most situations, but others are so rude that you should never use them at all.


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Take Phrasal Verbs and Idioms

There are a lot of British English idioms which use the verb take and this lesson will help you to learn, remember, and use the most common ones including, take a bath, take a break, take a bullet, take a chance on, take a dim view, take a firm stance, take a gander, take a hike, take a joke, take a leaf out of, take a load off, take a lot of stick, take a pew, take a running jump, take a step back, take a swing at, take after, take as it comes, take a backseat, take your breath away, take a breather, take a trip down memory lane, take your eyes off, take a fancy to, take for a spin, take for a fool, take for granted, take to heart, and take with a pinch of salt.


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Talk About the Future

If you could predict the future with 100% accuracy, you would be the richest person on the planet. It is the uncertainty of the future which dictates how we talk about it. There are four common ways to talk about the future in English, and it is the purpose of this English Activation Pack to show you how to talk about the future accurately. We will explore the use of will and other modal verbs, going to, the present continuous, and the present simple to talk about the future. You will find an Activation Quiz and an Activation Glossary to help you activate your future English. If you are ready to activate your English to talk about the future, do this lesson now.


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Talk about the Weather

How to talk about the weather in English using a video lecture and some self-test questions to help you learn. This lesson also looks at some English idioms related to weather and will help with your listening skills and your pronunciation. If you want to learn how to talk about the weather in English, you need to do this lesson.


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The Beach

Watch some short and amusing video clips and answer some simple questions to help with your English listening skills. These stop motion clay animation comedy animated short films match animated zoo animals with a soundtrack of people talking about their homes, making it appear as if the animals are being interviewed about their living conditions. Once you have watched each of the short video clips, try to answer the questions about what you have heard. Because the speakers you will hear are normal, everyday folk, this exercise will help you to develop your English listening skills while also providing a bit of light relief.


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The Colon - Punctuation for Students

The colon is the two dots, one above the other: few people seem to know how to use it, and most, consequently, don’t. Many writers believe that the colon has only one purpose: to introduce a list. This lesson aims to put your right as to the use of the colon.


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The Full Stop - Punctuation for Students

The full stop or period is the most commonly used punctuation mark in English. The most common use of the full stop is to mark the end of declaratory sentences. It can also be placed after initial letters used to stand for a name, as in R.I. Chalmers, and also to mark the individual letters of some acronyms and abbreviations. While first introduced by Aristophanes of Byzantium in the third century, the full stop in its current position became popular from the ninth century onwards, and once movable type printing had become established, the full stop as we know it became the norm. It is not a difficult piece of punctuation to use, and is far easier to use than the comma. This lesson has a video that will tell you all about the full stop and how to use it, and a quiz to check your understanding of some of the vocabulary in the video.


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The Problem with Humans

This lesson looks at why individually humans are stupid, ignorant, and pathetic, but collectively, as a species, we are capable of incredible achievements. How long would you survive if the fabric of our society dissolved away and we were left to fend for ourselves? What do you think will come after humans have outlived their usefulness? Do this lesson to find out some of my thoughts on this matter.


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The Suffix -ish

You have probably noticed the suffix -ish at the end of many English words. The suffix -ish is actually in the words English and British, and consequently Britlish, too. A suffix is a tag that we add to the end of words to change their meaning slightly. In the case of -ish we add it to the ends of nouns and adjectives to form adjectives which mean approximately, somewhat, or like. It’s a very old suffix which Old English inherited from the Germanic. Common uses of the suffix -ish are colour words, talking about the size of things, when talking about the temperature of things, when describing qualities, and it is often added to numbers and time to indicate approximation.


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This Week - Next Week - Last Week

Do you ever have problems specifying dates in English? This lesson will help put an end to any such issues. I’ll talk you through the way we specify future and past dates in English. I’ll give you some practice with choosing the best way to specify what date you want to talk about. I’ll show you how we reduce complex consonant clusters which form between words in speech segments.


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10 of our 47 English in Use British English Lessons


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