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162 Vocabulary British English Lessons

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be.

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10 of our 162 Vocabulary British English Lessons

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Honeycomb Joke

The British English vocabulary included in the exercises in the British library includes bomb, bumble, cake, cell, climb, comb, crumb, debt, doubt, dumb, hive, know, lamb, limb, money, numb, parallel, plate, plumb, son, starchy, steamy, sticky, stodgy, streaky, subtle, teeth, thumb, tomb, and wax. English humour can be difficult for non-native English speakers. This is why simple English jokes are a very good way of teaching vocabulary, and why I’ve chosen a very simple joke for this lesson. The joke asks, Why do bees have sticky hair? The answer, because they use honeycombs, will leave many students scratching their own heads. First, watch the video and see if you understand where the humour comes from in this British English joke. Then, do the exercises and learn why this joke is funny. The exercises will also help you with pronunciation issues, particularly with the silent B in words such as comb and many others.         


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Huge - Hard to Say

The word huge is a hard word to spell and to pronounce. In this lesson I’ll tell you what huge means, show you how to pronounce it with a standard British English accent, and give you some examples of its use. I’ll also look at other vocabulary of size adjectives such as colossal, diddy, diminutive, enormous, gigantic, ginormous, huge, immense, large, lilliputian, mammoth, massive, mega, microscopic, mini, minute, petite, prodigious, puny, teeny, tiddly, tiny, titanic, and vast. You can also practice your knowledge of the IPA symbols and pronunciation with some IPA transcriptions of these size adjectives.


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Idiom Activation Pack - Bakery

Idioms are expressions that are natural to native English speakers. They are very confusing for non-native English speakers. They're confusing because idioms don't mean what the words say. You cannot literally translate English idioms into another language. The vocabulary in this British English lesson is important for students to learn and master. There are a lot of idioms in this lesson as well as a set of questions which I have designed to help you learn, remember, and use the vocabulary and make it part of your active vocabulary. If you are serious about improving your British English vocabulary, these common British English idioms are essential. The idioms are: Break bread, Bread and butter, Crackers, Crumpet, Earn crust, Crusty, Best thing since sliced bread, Upper crust, Bun in the oven, Piffy on a rock bun, Finger in the pie, Humble pie, Nice as pie, Easy as pie, Finger in too many pies, Pie in the sky, Knuckle sandwich, and Warm as toast.  


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Idiom Activation Pack - Food Idioms 1

Idioms are expressions that are natural to native English speakers. They are very confusing for non-native English speakers. They're confusing because idioms don't mean what the words say. You cannot literally translate English idioms into another language. The vocabulary in this British English lesson is important for students to learn and master. There are a lot of idioms in this lesson as well as a set of questions which I have designed to help you learn, remember, and use the vocabulary and make it part of your active vocabulary. If you are serious about improving your British English vocabulary, these common British English idioms are essential. The idioms are: Beef about, An acquired taste, Eat alive, Salt-and-pepper, Bad apple, Carrot and stick, Take candy from a baby, Water off a duck's back, Save bacon, and Bad egg.


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Idiom Activation Pack - Food Idioms 2

Idioms are expressions that are natural to native English speakers. They are very confusing for non-native English speakers. They're confusing because idioms don't mean what the words say. You cannot literally translate English idioms into another language. The vocabulary in this British English lesson is important for students to learn and master. There are a lot of idioms in this lesson as well as a set of questions which I have designed to help you learn, remember, and use the vocabulary and make it part of your active vocabulary. If you are serious about improving your British English vocabulary, these common British English idioms are essential. The idioms are: A plum job, Boo to a goose, Chalk and cheese, Spice up, Greasy spoon, Sweet talk, Chopping block, Sweeten the pill, Done to a T, and Not cup of tea.


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Idiom Activation Pack - Food Idioms 3

Idioms are expressions that are natural to native English speakers. They are very confusing for non-native English speakers. They're confusing because idioms don't mean what the words say. You cannot literally translate English idioms into another language. The vocabulary in this British English lesson is important for students to learn and master. There are a lot of idioms in this lesson as well as a set of questions which I have designed to help you learn, remember, and use the vocabulary and make it part of your active vocabulary. If you are serious about improving your British English vocabulary, these common British English idioms are essential. The idioms are: Pepper with, Butterfingers, Know which side your bread is buttered, Too much on plate, Lamb to the slaughter, Ginger group, Beer gut, Plenty of fish in sea, Let off steam, and Like a knife through butter. 


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Idiom Activation Pack - Food Idioms 4

Idioms are expressions that are natural to native English speakers. They are very confusing for non-native English speakers. They're confusing because idioms don't mean what the words say. You cannot literally translate English idioms into another language. The vocabulary in this British English lesson is important for students to learn and master. There are a lot of idioms in this lesson as well as a set of questions which I have designed to help you learn, remember, and use the vocabulary and make it part of your active vocabulary. If you are serious about improving your British English vocabulary, these common British English idioms are essential. The idioms are: Wine and dine, Jam tomorrow, Upset the applecart, Make mincemeat of, Play gooseberry, Eat my hat, Eat for breakfast, Drink like a fish, Simmer down, and Till the bitter end.


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Idiom Activation Pack - Food Idioms 5

Idioms are expressions that are natural to native English speakers. They are very confusing for non-native English speakers. They're confusing because idioms don't mean what the words say. You cannot literally translate English idioms into another language. The vocabulary in this British English lesson is important for students to learn and master. There are a lot of idioms in this lesson as well as a set of questions which I have designed to help you learn, remember, and use the vocabulary and make it part of your active vocabulary. If you are serious about improving your British English vocabulary, these common British English idioms are essential. The idioms are: Eat your words, Teach grandmother to suck eggs, Cold shoulder, Cookie crumbles, Lolly, Blow off steam, Save own bacon, Run out of steam, Small beer, and In the drink.


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Idiom Activation Pack - Food Idioms 6

Idioms are expressions that are natural to native English speakers. They are very confusing for non-native English speakers. They're confusing because idioms don't mean what the words say. You cannot literally translate English idioms into another language. The vocabulary in this British English lesson is important for students to learn and master. There are a lot of idioms in this lesson as well as a set of questions which I have designed to help you learn, remember, and use the vocabulary and make it part of your active vocabulary. If you are serious about improving your British English vocabulary, these common British English idioms are essential. The idioms are: Eggs in one basket, Cheesy, Cool as a cucumber, Forbidden fruit, Give a fig, Knife-edge, Mutton dressed as lamb, Proof of the pudding, Red as a beetroot, and Rest on laurels.


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Idiom Activation Pack - Food Idioms 7

Idioms are expressions that are natural to native English speakers. They are very confusing for non-native English speakers. They're confusing because idioms don't mean what the words say. You cannot literally translate English idioms into another language. The vocabulary in this British English lesson is important for students to learn and master. There are a lot of idioms in this lesson as well as a set of questions which I have designed to help you learn, remember, and use the vocabulary and make it part of your active vocabulary. If you are serious about improving your British English vocabulary, these common British English idioms are essential. The idioms are: Over-egg the pudding, Sour grapes, Throw into the pot, Bone to pick, On a silver platter, Think moon made of green cheese, Turn to jelly, Just deserts, Have cake and eat it, and Let stew.


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10 of our 162 Vocabulary British English Lessons


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