Click for Free Account

162 Vocabulary British English Lessons

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be.

Support Us! Cat Rand Top IPA Vocabulary Newest

Responsive image

First Previous Next Last

10 of our 162 Vocabulary British English Lessons

Responsive image

Irregular F Plurals

What I call irregular F plurals are nouns that end in the /f/ sound and are irregular plurals. Words like leaf, wife, and wolf. Not all nouns that end in /f/ are irregular plurals, however. Words like gulf, turf, and clef are regular plurals. Regular plurals in English simply add an S to the noun. Boy become boys, girl becomes girls, and lesson becomes lessons. Irregular plurals don’t do this. Some words that end in the /f/ sound, form the plural using ves. Of the irregular F plurals, leaf becomes leaves, knife becomes knives, and wolf becomes wolves. Notice that knife ends in FE but has the /f/ sound.


Responsive image

Its or It's

It's a source of great confusion to both natives and non natives alike when writing its and it's. This lesson will explain how to know which one to use and why it's needed. It's got questions to help you practice, too. Learn when to use it's as the contracted form of it is or it has, and when to use its as the possessive adjective.


Responsive image

Its or It's Conversation Simulation

In this lesson, we will look at some common mistakes that even native English speakers make when it comes to using its and it's. Learn how to use these correctly and you will never again make the common mistakes that make you look not quite as proficient at English as you might like to look.


Responsive image

Just for Laughs 1

I’ve chosen 7 short British English jokes for this lesson. These 7 English jokes will help you understand English humour and improve your vocabulary. English humour can be difficult for non-native English speakers. This is why simple English jokes are a very good way of teaching vocabulary, and why  They will also show you how British English humour depends on word play, puns, and pronunciation, as well as the multiple meanings of some English words. There are exercises to go with each joke which will help you to really understand there the humour comes from. By mastering English humour, you will be developing your English skills in an enjoyable and memorable way. 


Responsive image

Knackered - Vocabulary Activator

Just as Eskimos have many words for snow, apparently, so, too, do the British, wearied by overwork, have many words for being tired such as drained, exhausted, fatigued, knackered, spent, tired out and worn out. This lesson will help you to learn, remember, and use these words without becoming exhausted in the process.


Responsive image

Leg Idioms

Learn some common British English idioms in this video English lesson from Britlish. The idioms are: Tail between your legs, On its last legs, Get a leg up, Pulling your leg, Shake a leg, Break a leg, Not have a leg to stand on, Stretch your legs, Legwork, and Sea legs. This lesson is part of the Body Idioms series of idioms lessons.


Responsive image

Level Test - 100 Questions

This 100-question test will give you a reasonable indication of your current level of English. Whatever your level, the Britlish Library lessons will help you to improve it quickly. How to Read Your Results Take the test and complete all 100 questions. Your score will reflect your level: 0 to 35 means you are pre-intermediate or lower (A1 to A2) 36 to 50 means you are intermediate (B1) 51 to 85 means you are upper intermediate (B2) 85 to 100 means you are advanced or higher (C1 to C2)


Responsive image

Library - Syncope

The word library is one of the words that students try very hard to pronounce properly, yet still get wrong. Other words like family, vegetable, chocolate, natural, favourite, medicine, general, and many more are also syncopated when we speak at a normal, fast-spoken rate. Many students initially refuse to believe that a word they have been pronouncing with three syllables all their life can be, and indeed, normally is, pronounced with just two syllables. Perhaps you are one of these students? If you are, prepare to be shocked and amazed by this lesson.


Responsive image

Lip Idioms

Learn some common British English idioms with this lesson from Britlish. The idioms are: Pay lip service, Lick your lips, Bite your lip, Give someone lip, My lips are sealed, Smack lips, Slip of the lip, Tight-lipped, Lock lips, Pass my lips, Stiff upper lip, A bit lippy, Read my lips, Loose lips, Button your lip, and On everyone’s lips. This lesson is part of the Body Idioms series at Britlish.com.


Responsive image

Look, Search, Seek

The three verbs, look, search, and seek, are very similar but are used in different situations. In this lesson, I will first look at how the verbs are used, then we will see some examples of usage, then I will give you some exercises to help you learn, remember, and use the three verbs correctly. If you have been searching for the way to use these three verbs, you need look no further. As we say, seek and you will find in the Britlish Library.


First Previous Next Last

10 of our 162 Vocabulary British English Lessons


Responsive image

Learn English with the most innovative and engaging English lessons available anywhere on the Internet and all completely free of charge! To personalise your experience in the Britlish Library and to keep track of the lessons you have studied and the vocabulary you have recorded, or the notes you have made about each class, sign up for a free account today.