55 English in Use Category Popular

Improve your understanding of everyday English with our English in Use activities! Whether you're a student of English as a second or foreign language, these activities focus on the practical use of the language, covering grammar, punctuation, and functional language. These interactive activities will help you improve your speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills. You will develop your confidence in using different types of text such as fiction, newspapers, and magazines. You will also learn to speak and write about everyday topics such as the weather, travel, and more, and prepare you for real-life situations such as ordering in a restaurant or buying a train ticket. Enhance your English language proficiency with our English in Use activities today!

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Digestive System Idioms

The 18 idioms are, cast-iron stomach, go belly up, to be yellow-bellied, hate someone's guts, gutted, gut-wrenching, not able to or cannot stomach something, a fire in your belly, sick to the stomach, a gut reaction or feeling, butterflies in your stomach, misery guts, turn the stomach, in the pit of your stomach, I have no stomach for something, have guts, to have a strong stomach, and have a bellyful of something. This British English idioms lesson will help to you learn, remember, and use 18 common British English idiomatic expressions to do with the digestive system. 

Body Idioms CourseSupport Us

Visited 1 hr, 33 mins, 51 secs ago

Categories: Idioms | Vocabulary | English in Use


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34 Tricky FCE Vocab - Challenge

Can you challenge yourself on one of the most important factors that is tested in the FCE - vocabulary? Having a larger vocabulary allows you to understand and use a wider range of words, which will help you to express yourself more clearly and accurately. Additionally, a larger vocabulary will also helps  you to read and understand texts more easily. In this challenge, you will be testing yourself on words that are considered difficult for students at FCE level. By mastering these words, you will be well on your way to acing the FCE and achieving your language goals.

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Visited 6 hrs, 51 mins, 35 secs ago

Categories: Challenges | AI Creations | Vocabulary | Spelling | Exam Practice | English in Use


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Make Off

Bernie Madoff died in prison on 14th April 2021 having served just 12 years of a 150-year prison sentence for running the biggest ever Ponzi scheme which defrauded people out of an estimated $65 billion. This English lesson takes a look at the ironic pronunciation of the phrasal verb make off, which means to steal money, and Bernie Madoff's last name which is a homophone with made off. The animation of the Madoff character in the video was done using iClone and Character Creator from Reallusion. I think it is the most realistic animation I have made to date.

Phrasal Verbs CourseSupport Us

Visited 1 day, 6 hrs, 52 mins, 6 secs ago

Categories: Phrasal Verbs | Vocabulary | English in Use


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Bone Idioms

The 12 idioms are, make no bones about it, a bone of contention, have a bone to pick with someone, dry as a bone, chilled to the bone, feel it in your bones, bone idle, close to the bone, have a skeleton in the closet, skin and bones, work your fingers to the bone, and bone shaking. This British English idioms lesson will help to you learn, remember, and use 12 common British English idiomatic expressions which use the word bone. 

Body Idioms CourseSupport Us

Visited 6 hrs, 22 mins, 25 secs ago

Categories: Idioms | Vocabulary | English in Use


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The Full Stop - Punctuation for Students

The full stop or period is the most commonly used punctuation mark in English. The most common use of the full stop is to mark the end of declaratory sentences. It can also be placed after initial letters used to stand for a name, as in R.I. Chalmers, and also to mark the individual letters of some acronyms and abbreviations. While first introduced by Aristophanes of Byzantium in the third century, the full stop in its current position became popular from the ninth century onwards, and once movable type printing had become established, the full stop as we know it became the norm. It is not a difficult piece of punctuation to use, and is far easier to use than the comma. This lesson has a video that will tell you all about the full stop and how to use it, and a quiz to check your understanding of some of the vocabulary in the video.

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Visited 2 hrs, 5 mins, 41 secs ago

Categories: Writing | Grammar | English in Use


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