27 Grammar Category Recent Visits

Improve your understanding of English grammar with our comprehensive activities. From aspects and tenses to sentence structures, our activities cover all aspects of English grammar. These activities are suitable for students of English as a second or foreign language and are designed to help improve speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills. Learn about the structure of words, phrases, clauses, sentences, and entire texts, as well as the eight parts of speech in English: nouns, determiners, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions. Our activities will help you master the complexities of English grammar and take your language proficiency to the next level. Start mastering English grammar today with our comprehensive activities.  

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The Full Stop - Punctuation for Students

The full stop or period is the most commonly used punctuation mark in English. The most common use of the full stop is to mark the end of declaratory sentences. It can also be placed after initial letters used to stand for a name, as in R.I. Chalmers, and also to mark the individual letters of some acronyms and abbreviations. While first introduced by Aristophanes of Byzantium in the third century, the full stop in its current position became popular from the ninth century onwards, and once movable type printing had become established, the full stop as we know it became the norm. It is not a difficult piece of punctuation to use, and is far easier to use than the comma. This lesson has a video that will tell you all about the full stop and how to use it, and a quiz to check your understanding of some of the vocabulary in the video.

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Visited 2 hrs, 39 mins, 30 secs ago

Categories: Writing | Grammar | English in Use


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Future 3 - GA14

The second most common way, after will, of talking about the future in English is by the use of be going to. I have already shown how an –ing form needs the finite verb be to form the continuous aspect. Be going to is the present continuous and acts as an auxiliary verb, like will, to talk about the future. We use be going to to talk about future things which are already planned. We use be going to to talk about future things which we can predict from present evidence. There is often no difference in meaning between be going to and the present continuous.       

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Visited 5 hrs, 33 mins, 32 secs ago

Categories: Grammar


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Past Simple - GA3

I told you about the past and present tenses in Grammar Activation Pack 1. I also introduced you to the aspects – simple, continuous, and perfect, and showed you why the three key verbs, do, be, and have, are so important. In Grammar Activation Pack 2, I looked at the Present tense, simple aspect. In this Grammar Activation Pack, I am going to tell you how the first of the key verbs, do, and is used for the simple aspect, past tense. The simple aspect of the past tense is marked by the auxiliary verb did, even when it appears to be missing. You might want to refresh your memory of the hidden do by taking another look at Grammar Activation Pack 1. This British English grammar is essential for all students of English and the many exercises in the pack will help you master it quickly and enjoyably.

Aspect and Tenses CourseSupport Us

Visited 6 hrs, 11 mins, 35 secs ago

Categories: Grammar


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Countable and Uncountable Nouns

I made a lot of video English lessons in 2010 as part of my Daily Dose of English series. Unfortunately, they never became quite as popular as I hoped they would. Nevertheless, they were interesting and relevant then and they remain so today. I have taken a video English lesson about countable and uncountable nouns and have turned it into this Britlish Library lesson. The technology I now use for my lessons allows me to explore the subject of countable and uncountable nouns in much greater detail than a simple video English lesson allows. Try this more active way of learning and see how countable and uncountable nouns really work. You will also learn about definite and indefinite articles.

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Visited 6 hrs, 28 mins, 32 secs ago

Categories: Grammar | Vocabulary


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Present Perfect Continuous - GA9

The perfect aspect of the present tense is marked by the auxiliary verb have plus the past participle. Remember that the tenses are shown by the auxiliary verbs, be, do, and have. If we have the present tense of have followed by a past participle, we have present perfect. So, if have plus a past participle gives us the perfect aspect, and be +ing gives us the continuous aspect, then together we should get the perfect continuous aspect. Well, it’s easy enough to name the aspects and the tenses, but you may be wondering how, when, and where we should use the perfect continuous aspect. In this Grammar Activation Pack we will look at the present tense, perfect continuous aspect. The very name of the structure tells us a lot about it. The present tense tells us there is a connection with the present, that is, now. The perfect aspect uses the past participle which shows a connection to the past. The continuous aspect talks about something happening over a period of time; in this case from a time in the past to the present. This British English grammar is essential for all students of English and the many exercises in the pack will help you master it quickly and enjoyably.    

Aspect and Tenses CourseSupport Us

Visited 8 hrs, 56 mins, 42 secs ago

Categories: Grammar


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