133 Pronunciation New-Old

Examples Vocabulary Dictation


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These Activities are designed to help you improve your pronunciation and communication skills in English. Whether you have a strong grasp of grammar and vocabulary or not, clear pronunciation is essential for effective communication. Through these activities, you will learn the nuances of English speech, including elision, simplification, intonation, stress, and rhythm, and develop the ability to understand spoken English. Additionally, you will gain a deeper understanding of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) symbols and improve your pronunciation, making you a more confident and effective communicator in the English language.

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Beach or Bitch

A Sounds Rude lesson for 18+ students that will teach you how to avoid a common pronunciation mistake. If you are easily offended by language that Sounds Rude, go no further. If you would like to learn the vocabulary which every native-born Englishman, or woman for that matter, is very familiar with, then I urge you to read on. Vocabulary is vocabulary and it all makes up the English language. The vocabulary in this lesson is not normally found in textbooks or discussed in the English classroom, yet it is an integral part of the language, and very likely to be regularly encountered in an English speaking country.

Categorías: Speaking Pronunciation IPA Symbols


Fur or Fir - Homophones

The two words fur and fir are homophones in English and cause a lot of pronunciation confusion for students. I mean, how can two words that are radically different have exactly the same sound? There are many homophones in English and this lesson is designed to help you master these two. Not only does it deal with the words fir and fur, but it also deals with words like furred, furry, furlike, furl, furlong, furlough, furnace, furniture, furore, further, fury, fire, firkin, firm, first, fifth, and firth. This lesson will help you to pronounce all of these words perfectly.

Categorías: Pronunciation Confusables IPA Symbols Speaking


Syllabic Consonants -ism

-ism is a suffix appended to the end of many English words. It means taking sides with or imitation of. Pronunciation-wise, -ism has a syllabic consonant /m/ at the end. In this lesson, we’ll look at how we pronounce some common isms. The -isms include, ageism, asceticism, atheism, Buddhism, capitalism, communism, Cubism, Druidism, dualism, Expressionism, Judaism, racism, Romanticism, sexism, and socialism.

Categorías: Pronunciation IPA Symbols Speaking


Library - Syncope

The word library is one of the words that students try very hard to pronounce properly, yet still get wrong. Other words like family, vegetable, chocolate, natural, favourite, medicine, general, and many more are also syncopated when we speak at a normal, fast-spoken rate. Many students initially refuse to believe that a word they have been pronouncing with three syllables all their life can be, and indeed, normally is, pronounced with just two syllables. Perhaps you are one of these students? If you are, prepare to be shocked and amazed by this lesson.

Categorías: Pronunciation Listenings Vocabulary


The Glottal Stop

This lesson will tell you what a glottal stop is and then tell you how to use it. A glottal stop is also known as the voiceless glottal plosive and it’s used in many languages besides English. In fact, you probably use it without being aware of it. The glottal stop is called the glottal stop because the sound is made when the vocal cords close and stop the flow of air. The gap between the vocal cords is called the glottis. The glottal stop is also known as the voiceless glottal plosive, which means their air flow is obstructed between the lungs and the mouth by the closing of the vocal cords. The most pronounced use of the glottal stop can be found in Cockney English where the glottal stop replaces the /p/, the /t/, and the /k/ sounds when they are preceded by a stressed vowel sound and are followed by an unstressed vowel sound.

Categorías: Pronunciation IPA Symbols Speaking


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