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31 Grammar British English Lessons

These lessons focus on the grammar of English. English grammar compared to other grammars is quite simple, but in its simplicity lies its complexity. The lessons here cover all aspects of English grammar from the aspects and tenses to sentence structures. English grammar covers the structure of words, phrases, clauses, sentences, and entire texts. There are eight parts of speech in English: nouns, determiners, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions. The largest of these parts of speech are the nouns which, unlike most European languages, do not have grammatical gender. English grammar has largely done away with the inflectional case system of other European languages and bases its grammar on analytic constructions. The lessons in this category will go some way to helping you get a better understanding of English grammar.    

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10 of our 31 Grammar British English Lessons

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Countable and Uncountable Nouns

I made a lot of video English lessons in 2010 as part of my Daily Dose of English series. Unfortunately, they never became quite as popular as I hoped they would. Nevertheless, they were interesting and relevant then and they remain so today. I have taken a video English lesson about countable and uncountable nouns and have turned it into this Britlish Library lesson. The technology I now use for my lessons allows me to explore the subject of countable and uncountable nouns in much greater detail than a simple video English lesson allows. Try this more active way of learning and see how countable and uncountable nouns really work. You will also learn about definite and indefinite articles.


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Orientation of Things

There are several fixed expressions using prepositions in English with which we talk about the orientation of things. If you have ever put on a jumper to find that the front is on your back and the back is on your front, or the inside is showing and the outside is hidden, then these expressions are important for you. In this lesson you will learn about inside out, back to front, upside down, the right way up, and the wrong way up. You will also learn the vocabulary: artist, button, conform, design, expose, fasten, hang on wall, point out, printed, rough, seam, smooth, and tailored.


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The Colon - Punctuation for Students

The colon is the two dots, one above the other: few people seem to know how to use it, and most, consequently, don’t. Many writers believe that the colon has only one purpose: to introduce a list. This lesson aims to put your right as to the use of the colon.


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CPE Reading and Use of English

The Cambridge Proficiency Exam (CPE) reading and use of English is a set of 7 questions from the full CPE exam for which students are given 90 minutes to complete the exam. I have created an example exam using the same format as in the CPE and you can do a full, reading and use of English exam timed for 90 minutes to help you get used to planning your time wisely in the actual exam. You can also do parts 1-4, part 5, part 6, and part 7, separately as untimed tests if you just want to practice the exam technique. Each of the tests in this activator will give you immediate feedback on your score and show you where you might have made mistakes. There are 53 questions in total in the Reading and Use of English part of the CPE and you can score a maximum of 72 points. These tests reflect the official Cambridge scoring system.


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The Full Stop - Punctuation for Students

The full stop or period is the most commonly used punctuation mark in English. The most common use of the full stop is to mark the end of declaratory sentences. It can also be placed after initial letters used to stand for a name, as in R.I. Chalmers, and also to mark the individual letters of some acronyms and abbreviations. While first introduced by Aristophanes of Byzantium in the third century, the full stop in its current position became popular from the ninth century onwards, and once movable type printing had become established, the full stop as we know it became the norm. It is not a difficult piece of punctuation to use, and is far easier to use than the comma. This lesson has a video that will tell you all about the full stop and how to use it, and a quiz to check your understanding of some of the vocabulary in the video.


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Commas - Punctuation for Students

Oscar Wilde, a great British writer, once admitted to spending an entire morning removing a comma from a poem. Asked if that was all he had done, Wilde replied, By no means: on mature reflection, I put back the comma. If a great writer like Oscar Wilde had difficulty in deciding where and when to use a comma, what chance have the rest of us got? In this lesson I will teach you about the history of the comma and about how to use it. You will learn about clauses, ambiguity, the Oxford comma, question tags, coordinating conjunctions, coordinate adjectives, dates, and more. Do this lesson and you will be more confident in your ability to use the comma in your written English.


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Its or It's

It's a source of great confusion to both natives and non natives alike when writing its and it's. This lesson will explain how to know which one to use and why it's needed. It's got questions to help you practice, too. Learn when to use it's as the contracted form of it is or it has, and when to use its as the possessive adjective.


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Question Tags

Question tags are short questions placed at the end of statements in informal writing and normal speech, and they are used to indicate that we want some information or that we want confirmation of something we believe to be the case. Usually we use positive question tags with negative statements and negative question tags with positive statement. We can, however, use positive with positive in some circumstances to express our feelings. This lesson will tell you everything you need to know about question tags, won't it?  


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Level Test - 100 Questions

This 100-question test will give you a reasonable indication of your current level of English. Whatever your level, the Britlish Library lessons will help you to improve it quickly. How to Read Your Results Take the test and complete all 100 questions. Your score will reflect your level: 0 to 35 means you are pre-intermediate or lower (A1 to A2) 36 to 50 means you are intermediate (B1) 51 to 85 means you are upper intermediate (B2) 85 to 100 means you are advanced or higher (C1 to C2)


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35 Proficient Mistakes

Even proficient students make mistakes! No matter how much you study English, you will always make mistakes. Even native English speakers make mistakes. In this English Activation Pack, we will look at 35 common mistakes that even proficient students of English make. By working your way through these mistakes, you can learn to avoid them yourself. Mistakes are an important part of the learning process and when you see these common mistakes that many students make, you will, hopefully, stop making them yourself. By working through these mistakes, you are training your mind to avoid making the mistakes again.


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10 of our 31 Grammar British English Lessons


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