27 Grammar Category New-Old

Improve your understanding of English grammar with our comprehensive activities. From aspects and tenses to sentence structures, our activities cover all aspects of English grammar. These activities are suitable for students of English as a second or foreign language and are designed to help improve speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills. Learn about the structure of words, phrases, clauses, sentences, and entire texts, as well as the eight parts of speech in English: nouns, determiners, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions. Our activities will help you master the complexities of English grammar and take your language proficiency to the next level. Start mastering English grammar today with our comprehensive activities.  

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Commas - Punctuation for Students

Oscar Wilde, a great British writer, once admitted to spending an entire morning removing a comma from a poem. Asked if that was all he had done, Wilde replied, By no means: on mature reflection, I put back the comma. If a great writer like Oscar Wilde had difficulty in deciding where and when to use a comma, what chance have the rest of us got? In this lesson I will teach you about the history of the comma and about how to use it. You will learn about clauses, ambiguity, the Oxford comma, question tags, coordinating conjunctions, coordinate adjectives, dates, and more. Do this lesson and you will be more confident in your ability to use the comma in your written English.

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Visited 3 hrs, 31 mins, 58 secs ago

Categories: Writing | Grammar


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Its or It's

It's a source of great confusion to both natives and non natives alike when writing its and it's. This lesson will explain how to know which one to use and why it's needed. It's got questions to help you practice, too. Learn when to use it's as the contracted form of it is or it has, and when to use its as the possessive adjective.

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Visited 1 hr, 2 mins, 34 secs ago

Categories: Vocabulary | Spelling | Grammar


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Question Tags

Question tags are short questions placed at the end of statements in informal writing and normal speech, and they are used to indicate that we want some information or that we want confirmation of something we believe to be the case. Usually we use positive question tags with negative statements and negative question tags with positive statement. We can, however, use positive with positive in some circumstances to express our feelings. This lesson will tell you everything you need to know about question tags, won't it?  

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Visited 1 day, 23 hrs, 16 mins, 58 secs ago

Categories: Grammar | Vocabulary | English in Use


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Will Continuous and Will Perfect - GA15

In Grammar Activation Pack 13, we looked at how we use will and shall to talk about the future. In this Pack we will be looking at other ways to use will to talk about the future. You already know that the future tense is marked by will, the continuous aspect is marked by be +ing, and the perfect aspect is marked by have plus past participle. In this pack we will be looking at the differences between the future continuous the future perfect, and the future perfect continuous. The future continuous tell us that at a time in the future the action will be ongoing. We can use will be +ing in a similar way to be going to to talk about things we plan to do.    

Aspect and Tenses CourseSupport Us

Visited 1 day, 13 hrs, 29 mins, 37 secs ago

Categories: Grammar


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Future 3 - GA14

The second most common way, after will, of talking about the future in English is by the use of be going to. I have already shown how an –ing form needs the finite verb be to form the continuous aspect. Be going to is the present continuous and acts as an auxiliary verb, like will, to talk about the future. We use be going to to talk about future things which are already planned. We use be going to to talk about future things which we can predict from present evidence. There is often no difference in meaning between be going to and the present continuous.       

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Visited 23 hrs, 51 mins, 38 secs ago

Categories: Grammar


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