27 Grammar Category New-Old

Improve your understanding of English grammar with our comprehensive activities. From aspects and tenses to sentence structures, our activities cover all aspects of English grammar. These activities are suitable for students of English as a second or foreign language and are designed to help improve speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills. Learn about the structure of words, phrases, clauses, sentences, and entire texts, as well as the eight parts of speech in English: nouns, determiners, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions. Our activities will help you master the complexities of English grammar and take your language proficiency to the next level. Start mastering English grammar today with our comprehensive activities.  

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The Periodic Table of the Elements

How to say all of the 118 elements of the periodic table while learning about comparatives and superlatives. For those students who have an interest in the periodic table and the chemical elements or who have to learn them in English, this lesson will ensure that you can correctly pronounce them all with a British accent. Some of the elements are pronounced differently in American English. This lesson also looks at superlatives and comparatives in English. Most of the information about the elements contains comparative or superlative forms to give you plenty of examples of how to use them.  

Periodic Table CourseSupport Us

Visited 22 hrs, 2 mins, 21 secs ago

Categories: Vocabulary | Grammar | IPA Symbols | Pronunciation


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Future 2 - GA13

In the previous Grammar Activation Packs I have introduced you to the present and the past tenses, along with the simple, continuous, and perfect aspects. I also mentioned that English has only the two tenses, present and past. This lesson looks at Will or Shall for Future, Asking for Decisions, Promises and Threats, Decisions Made at the Moment, Predicting, Conditionals, Giving Orders or Instructions, Negative Will for Refusals, Negative Shall for Refusals, things Not Rooted in Present, and Future Time Indicators. This British English grammar is essential for all students of English and the many exercises in the pack will help you master it quickly and enjoyably.    

Aspect and Tenses CourseSupport Us

Visited 1 day, 18 mins, 1 sec ago

Categories: Grammar


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Future 1 - GA12

In the previous Grammar Activation Packs I have introduced you to the present and the past tenses, along with the simple, continuous, and perfect aspects. I also mentioned that English has only the two tenses, present and past. So where does this leave us when we want to talk about the future? Don’t worry, there are several ways that we can talk about the future, including using the present tense, which is what I am going to explain in this lesson. There are two aspects of the present tense that we can use to talk about the future. We can use the simple aspect which uses the auxiliary verb do. We can also use the continuous aspect, which uses the auxiliary verb be, and the ing form of a non-finite verb.    

Aspect and Tenses CourseSupport Us

Visited 12 hrs, 19 mins, 9 secs ago

Categories: Grammar | Phrasal Verbs


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Past Perfect Continuous - GA11

Regular verbs form their past tense by adding ed. Irregular verbs have a past tense form that you must learn individually. Remember, too, that the continuous aspect of the past tense is marked by the auxiliary verb be plus the ing form of a verb. If you see the verb be followed by an ing form, it’s the continuous aspect. Verb to be plus ing! is really all you need to know to identify the continuous aspect. So, if had plus a past participle gives us the perfect aspect, and be +ing gives us the continuous aspect, then together we get the past tense, perfect continuous aspect. While it is easy to name the aspects and the tenses, what is less clear is how, when, and where we should use the past perfect continuous.     

Aspect and Tenses CourseSupport Us

Visited 1 day, 4 hrs, 32 mins, 53 secs ago

Categories: Grammar


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Past Perfect - GA10

As you have already learnt, the past tense is indicted by the past forms of the three key verbs, do, be, and have. With do, the past is indicated by did for all persons. With be, the past is indicated by was for third persons, and were for all other persons. With have, the past is indicated by had for all persons. The past tense is shown by the inflected past form of the verb have, had, and this is used for all subjects. Past tense, perfect aspect is one of the least used of all the tense-aspect combinations in English. The past perfect has one main use and that it to talk about one thing that happened before another thing in the past. The past perfect basically talks about the past in the past. This British English grammar is essential for all students of English and the many exercises in the pack will help you master it quickly and enjoyably.    

Aspect and Tenses CourseSupport Us

Visited 1 day, 18 hrs, 34 mins, 21 secs ago

Categories: Grammar


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