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28 Confusables British English Lessons

Certain words in English are so alike that they confuse even native English speakers. Words like its and it's for instance are often confused. The lessons here look in detail at some of the most common confusable words and give you plenty of explanation into how to use them correctly as well as plenty of exercises to help you avoid making mistakes in the future. 

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10 of our 28 Confusables British English Lessons

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Everyday Collocations

A collocation is a pair of words or a group of words that are used together. Collocations sound natural to native English speakers, but students of English often make mistakes with collocations. You have to learn collocations because they are difficult to guess from the words alone. The verbs do and make are often confused by students, but these two verbs are used in many common everyday collocations. Many students, for instance, make mistakes when they say do mistakes. This lesson will help you to avoid making the same mistakes.


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Health Collocations

Collocations are ground of words which normally go together such as cook a meal. To say make a meal or do a meal sound strange to native English speakers. If you use the correct collocations when speaking or writing in English, you will sound much more natural and much more like a native British English speaker. This lesson looks at some common collocations to do with medicine and health. Makes notes of the new vocabulary in your personal Study Record which you will find on each lesson page in the Britlish Library. This language is very useful for students who plan to take exams. This is one of the five-minute collocations series of lessons and should take you about 5 minutes to complete.


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Food and Drink Collocations

Collocations are ground of words which normally go together such as paint a picture. To say make a picture or do a picture sound strange to native English speakers. If you use the correct collocations when speaking or writing in English, you will sound much more natural and much more like a native British English speaker. This lesson looks at some common collocations to do with food and eating. Makes notes of the new vocabulary in your personal Study Record which you will find on each lesson page in the Britlish Library. This language is very useful for students who plan to take exams. This is one of the five-minute collocations series of lessons and should take you about 5 minutes to complete.


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Sell - Sale

People sell us things every day. Buying and selling things is what makes the world go round. This lesson will teach you the difference between on sale and for sale, as well as prepositions we use with other expressions like sell out, sell on, and up for sale.


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Would or Used To

In 2010 I would make a new YouTube video English lesson every day. I called the series Daily Dose of English. Unfortunately, the series would never be as popular or as useful as I had hoped because it was too passive. I would later create the Britlish Library and find the software I needed to make my original vision for my lessons a reality. The Daily Doses of English were useful then and they are still useful today, but now I am able to make them into the active learning lessons that I used to dream about. This active English lesson looks at the verbs would and used to and shows you how to use them.


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Made of or Made from

In this lesson I use a video English lesson that I made in 2010 to teach the difference between made from and made of. It was a valuable lesson back then, and it’s a valuable lesson today, too.


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Adapt or Adopt

The two words adapt and adopt, and their derivatives, are often confused by students. This lesson will look at how we use the two words and what the differences are between them. We will look at the words: adapt, adapted, adapting, adaption, adaptation, adapter, readapt, adaptive, adaptable, adapted, adaptive, adopt, adoption, adopter, adoptee, readopt, adoptable, adoptive, and adopted.


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In a Row

To say that things are in a row means that they are arranged in a line next to one another either in space or time. By extension, the idiomatic expression, in a row, means that several events happen consecutively, one after the other. This lesson will help you to use this common expression. We need to be careful with the word row, however, as it has several meanings and even different pronunciation. The first meaning is a noun meaning an arrangement of objects side by side in a line as in a row of books on the shelf. The second meaning is a verb meaning to propel a boat using oars as in he rowed the rowing boat across the lake. The third meaning is a noun and verb meaning to have an angry dispute as in he had a row with his wife about his drinking.


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Do or Make Revision

The lesson, Do or Make, will introduce you to the uses of the verbs do or make and this lesson will give you some revision of some common collocations with these verbs. The collocations include: a bad job, a comment, a confession, a degree, a fortune, a good job, a joke, a life, a list, a living, a loss, a noise, a point, a profit, a promise, a statement, a suggestion, a workout, an effort, believe, business, friends, good, gymnastics, harm, love, money, my homework, nothing, progress, some exercise, some work, the bed, the dishes, the effort, the hoovering, the housework, the ironing, the shopping, the washing up, the washing, well, your hair, your job, your job, your makeup, your nails, and yourself go to the gym.


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Better than Nothing

There is a group of words in English which I will call the *thing words. These words are anything, something, everything, and nothing. If I’ve learned anything about them, I’ve learned that they cause confusion for students, so I thought I ought to make a lesson to tell you everything about them. Everything you want to know about the *thing words is here in this lesson, so if you do nothing else today at least do something about learning these words with this lesson.


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10 of our 28 Confusables British English Lessons


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