Click for Free Account

99 Pronunciation British English Lessons

No matter how good your English grammar and vocabulary may be, if your pronunciation is so bad that nobody can understand a word you say, then you are at a grave disadvantage in regards to your English. These lessons have been designed to help you to improve your pronunciation, as well as other areas of your English.

Support Us! Cat Rand Top IPA Pronunciation A-Z

Responsive image

First Previous Next Last

10 of our 99 Pronunciation British English Lessons

Responsive image

If-

The poem, If-, by Rudyard Kipling was written around 1895, shortly after the birth of Kipling’s son, John. The poem is an example of Victorian stoicism and takes the form of the author’s paternal advice to his son. John Kipling was reported as wounded and missing in 1915 while serving as a Lieutenant during World War I, a post his father had secured him thanks to his social connections and despite his son’s severe myopia. His grave was not identified until 1992. You can read this poem in Latin script and in IPA script as well as listen to me read it for you.


Responsive image

Food and Drink Collocations

Collocations are ground of words which normally go together such as paint a picture. To say make a picture or do a picture sound strange to native English speakers. If you use the correct collocations when speaking or writing in English, you will sound much more natural and much more like a native British English speaker. This lesson looks at some common collocations to do with food and eating. Makes notes of the new vocabulary in your personal Study Record which you will find on each lesson page in the Britlish Library. This language is very useful for students who plan to take exams. This is one of the five-minute collocations series of lessons and should take you about 5 minutes to complete.


Responsive image

Alaska

This Alaska joke gets its humour from the pronunciation features of British English. If you understand the rhythm of English and how weak and strong syllables behave when we speak, you will be able to understand the humour of this joke. The Britlish Library lesson explains how and why the joke is funny and gives you plenty of exercises to help you learn, remember, and use these pronunciation features.


Responsive image

Yacht

The word yacht is a difficult word to spell and to pronounce. In this lesson I’ll tell you what yacht means, show you how to pronounce it with a standard British English accent, and give you some examples of its use. I’ll also look at other vocabulary which is associated with yachts such as boat, craft, cruise, engine, luxury, manage, own, sail, sailing, ship, and trip. You can also practice your knowledge of the IPA symbols and pronunciation with some IPA transcriptions of these words associated with yacht.


Responsive image

Buttercup

A lot of jokes in English depend for their humour on the way completely different words can sound identical due to the speech features we find in spoken British English. This is one of those jokes. Listen to the joke and then do the exercises so that you can learn about why it is so funny. English humour can be difficult for non-native English speakers. This is why simple English jokes are a very good way of teaching vocabulary, and why I’ve chosen a very simple joke for this lesson. I’m not going to write the joke here as it depends for its humour entirely on a homophone.       


Responsive image

Aisle - Hard to Say

The word aisle is a difficult word to spell and to pronounce. In this lesson I’ll tell you what aisle means, show you how to pronounce it with a standard British English accent, and give you some examples of its use. I’ll also look at other vocabulary which rhyme with aisle such as bile, dial, file, isle, mile, pile, smile, style, tile, trial, vile, and while. You can also practice your knowledge of the IPA symbols and pronunciation with some IPA transcriptions of these words which rhyme with aisle.


Responsive image

Acre - Hard to Say

The word acre is a difficult word to spell and to pronounce. In this lesson I’ll tell you what acre means, show you how to pronounce it with a standard British English accent, and give you some examples of its use. I’ll also look at other vocabulary which is associated with acres such as area, bake, break, fake, furrow, heartache, length, long, make, medieval, narrow, ox, oxen, plough, quake, rule of thumb, shake, soil, support, take, wake, and yard. You can also practice your knowledge of the IPA symbols and pronunciation with some IPA transcriptions of these words associated with acre.  


Responsive image

Choir - Hard to Say

The word choir is a difficult word to spell and to pronounce. In this lesson I’ll tell you what choir means, show you how to pronounce it with a standard British English accent, and give you some examples of its use. I’ll also look at other vocabulary which begins with CHO but do not necessarily have the same pronunciation such as chocolate, choir, choke, cholesterol, chondrite, choose, choosy, chop, choral, chord, chore, choreographer, chorister, chorizo, chortle, chorus, chosen, chough, chow, and chowder. You can also practice your knowledge of the IPA symbols and pronunciation with some IPA transcriptions of these CHO words.


Responsive image

Eschew - Hard to Say

The word eschew is a hard word to spell and to pronounce. In this lesson I’ll tell you what eschew means, show you how to pronounce it with a standard British English accent, and give you some examples of its use. I’ll also look at other vocabulary of refusal or acceptance such as abandon, abjure, avoid, disdain, embrace, eschew, forego, forswear, give up, grab, grasp, hold, keep clear of, refrain from, renounce, repudiate, seize, shun, spurn, take hold of, and welcome. You can also practice your knowledge of the IPA symbols and pronunciation with some IPA transcriptions of these verbs of refusal or acceptance.


Responsive image

The Strawberry Nose

Sit back and listen to this very British look at how an Englishman deals with an unfortunate change of appearance. Simple Stories were written by Arthur Hammond Marshall (1866-1934) who wrote under the pen name of Archibald Marshall. His humorous stories were written for Punch, a satirical magazine published in Britain between 1841 and 1992. The Simple Stories make fun of stereotypical British characteristics such as our stiff upper lip, our sense of duty, our deference to royalty, and our pride in our country to name but a few. Because Simple Stories are short stories intended for an adult audience and are written in a simple style and vocabulary, they are ideal stories for learners of English. There are few words that will confuse even lower-level students.


First Previous Next Last

10 of our 99 Pronunciation British English Lessons


Responsive image

Learn English with the most innovative and engaging English lessons available anywhere on the Internet and all completely free of charge! To personalise your experience in the Britlish Library and to keep track of the lessons you have studied and the vocabulary you have recorded, or the notes you have made about each class, sign up for a free account today.