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72 Sounds British Pronunciation British English Lessons

No matter how good your English grammar and vocabulary may be, if your pronunciation is so bad that nobody can understand a word you say, then you are at a grave disadvantage in regards to your English. These lessons have been designed to help you to improve your pronunciation, as well as other areas of your English.

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13 British English Lesson Categories

I have categorised the lessons in the Britlish library into the following categories: English in Use lessons, Exams and Tests lessons, Grammar lessons, Humour lessons, Idioms lessons, Information lessons, Literature lessons, Phrasal Verbs lessons, Sounds British Pronunciation lessons, Spelling lessons, Vocabulary lessons, Writing lessons, Sounds Rude lessons, and more.

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72 Sounds British Pronunciation British English Lessons

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Syllabic Consonants in Words Ending *LE

A syllabic consonant is a consonant that is pronounced as a syllable. The two main syllabic consonants in English are /l/ or /n/ sounds. The /l/ syllabic consonant occurs at the end of the word bottle, while the /n/ occurs in words like listen. Syllabic consonants occur mainly in the final syllable of words. In this lesson, we will look at the 11 possible letter combinations that can result in a final-syllable /l/ syllabic consonant: a syllable which has a consonant not a vowel as the peak. I have chosen one word for each of the following endings which produce a syllable consonant: -ble, -cle, -dle, -fle, -gle, -kle, -ple, -sle, -tle, -xle, and -zle. Some of these combinations have many examples, while others have few. There are no other -*le endings in English words which produce the /l/ syllabic consonant.


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S or Z

When do we use the /s/ sound and when do we use the /z/ sound, and what’s the difference? Let’s find out… The two sounds /s/ and /z/ are very close and cause endless confusion for students. There are some rules and the rules are normally to do with the voiced and unvoiced sounds. A voiced sound is that made when we use our vocal cords. /z/ is the voiced form of the sound /s/, which is unvoiced. Put your fingers on your throat when you say the word buzz. You should feel a vibration in your throat at the end of the word. This is caused by the vocal cords vibrating and adding to the sound. Now say hiss. This time you should not feel any vibration in your throat. Your vocal cords are not involved in making the sound /s/.  


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Homophones and Homonyms

If we look at the words homophone and homonym we see that they both start with homo which means same. In the last part of homophone, phone means sound and in homonym, nym means name. Homophone means words that have the same sound but different meanings. There are several hundred homophones in English. Homonym means words that are written the same, but have different meanings, and maybe different pronunciations. This lesson uses many of my video English lessons to show you how homophones and homonyms are used, and also has some exercises to give you some practice of some of the common ones.  


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Speech Segments

A look at how and why speech is broken up into parts, or segments, and how this segmentation affects pronunciation. This lesson will help you to hear the breaks in speech that we get at speech segment boundaries but not within the segments themselves. This look at this important feature of pronunciation also looks at content and function words and shows how these words are hear prominently or less prominently.


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Tin Tin Tin

A quick look at how not all English from Britain sounds the same and how it can be quite confusing for students. There are 100s of regional accents and many distinct dialects in Britain. Many English people have difficulty understanding some of the more unusual varieties of English found in the British Isles, so it's no surprise that students of English are completely confounded when they first encounter such English. This lesson will introduce you to the wonderful world of the English heard in Yorkshire, a region of North East England, and a part of the country in which I spent some years in my formative years.


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72 Sounds British Pronunciation British English Lessons

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aprendre anglès britànic | naučit se britskou angličtinu | õppida Suurbritannia inglise keelt | lerne britisches Englisch | imparare l'inglese britannico | išmokti britų anglų kalbos | lære britisk engelsk | учить британский английский | aprender inglés británico | బ్రిటిష్ ఇంగ్లీష్ నేర్చుకోండి | برطانوی انگریزی سیکھیں | เรียนรู้ภาษาอังกฤษแบบอังกฤษ | lära sig brittisk engelska | научите британски енглески | uczyć się brytyjskiego angielskiego | belajar Bahasa Inggeris Inggeris | イギリス英語を学ぶ | μάθετε Αγγλικά Αγγλικά | matuto ng British English | lære britisk engelsk | 学习英式英语 | تعلم الإنجليزية البريطانية | ব্রিটিশ ইংরেজি শিখুন | 學習英式英語 | leer Brits Engels | oppia englannin englantia | ללמוד אנגלית בריטית | 영국 영어 배우기 | ബ്രിട്ടീഷ് ഇംഗ്ലീഷ് പഠിക്കുക | aprender inglês britânico | naučiť sa britskú angličtinu | англисии бритониёиро омӯзед | İngiliz İngilizcesi öğrenmek | học tiếng anh Anh | вивчати британську англійську | பிரிட்டிஷ் ஆங்கிலம் கற்க | naučite se britanske angleščine | invata engleza britanica | ब्रिटिश इंग्रजी शिका | mācīties britu angļu valodu | belajar bahasa Inggris British | apprendre l'anglais britannique | lerni britan anglan | naučiti britanski engleski | научете британски английски