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56 Listenings British English Lessons

Reading is the easiest way to take in English. Listening is a much harder skill and one that has to be developed as you study the language. There are lots of speech features that arise when native English speakers speak English. These speech features, such as elision, simplification, intonation, stress, and rhythm, and the way in which speakers may miss out sounds or whole words, are important to understand if you are to be able to listen to and fully understand spoken English. These Britlish Library lessons will help you to develop you listening skills.  

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6 of our 56 Listenings British English Lessons

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The Beach

Watch some short and amusing video clips and answer some simple questions to help with your English listening skills. These stop motion clay animation comedy animated short films match animated zoo animals with a soundtrack of people talking about their homes, making it appear as if the animals are being interviewed about their living conditions. Once you have watched each of the short video clips, try to answer the questions about what you have heard. Because the speakers you will hear are normal, everyday folk, this exercise will help you to develop your English listening skills while also providing a bit of light relief.


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You're in Trouble

I haven't always been an English teacher. Indeed, I have done quite a few jobs, including two stints as a police officer. When I look back on my days as a police officer, I can recall many incidents that I'd like to share with you as anecdotes to help you develop your reading, listening comprehension, and vocabulary skills. Today's anecdote is about an incident I dealt with while working on my beat in the small village of Saint Martins, in Shropshire, England. I was, at the time, the village policeman, and spent my days driving around my beat in my trusty old Land Rover. It was a very sleepy village, and exciting incidents were few and far between. I should warn you that the incident I'm about to relate to you is not particularly exciting. Nevertheless, it's certainly one incident in my policing career that I shall never forget.        


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Cupboard Love

Listen to a short story to improve your listening skills and develop your vocabulary. Listening Activator - Cupboard Love. A romantic fiction story. An attempt to stop the lecherous attention of a colleague results in unexpected consequences for two young girls working on a Youth Training Scheme (YTS) in a nursing home in England. This story originally appeared in 1988 in the women's romantic fiction magazine Loving. It was the first story that they published with from a male writer and they started a new section in the magazine called Something Different. Richard spent a couple of years in the 1980s writing romantic fiction.    


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An Offer You Can't Refuse

This Conversation Activation Pack will give you practice in using the following expressions in a natural, realistic way: a bit rich, bail out, bite the hand that feeds you, build bridges, bump into, by any means, call on, come across, come by, come off it, contrite, get out of hand, hear someone out, hook up, jammy, make amends, not have the foggiest, not put something past someone, olive branch, pay off a debt, pilfer, Ponzi scheme, pop in, pull someone’s leg, reflect on, ring a bell, run into, sent down, spot on, sure-fire, time off for good behaviour, to sink something, to what do I owe this pleasure, turn over a new leaf, turn the clock back, weasel, and win someone round.


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Weather English - Wind

Have you ever wondered how to talk about the wind? If you have, then this English Activation Pack is for you. Activating your English Skills. Wind is a very important feature of the weather. Wind is so important that it has its own measurement system, the Beaufort Scale. The Beaufort scale runs from 0 to 12. This English Activation Pack gives you all the language you need to talk about windy weather.  


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Silent H at the Beginning of Words

Some English words begin with the letter H but don’t start with the / h / sound. This is because these words were borrowed into English from the original French. At first, they kept their French pronunciation, but gradually, over time, most of them became Anglicised and lost their French connection. Some of them, however, refused to lose their posh French pronunciation. These words, like honour, never had the / h / sound inserted at the beginning. I made this video and the English Activation Pack to help students like you learn which words should be pronounced with an initial / h / sound and which should not.


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6 of our 56 Listenings British English Lessons


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