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99 Pronunciation British English Lessons

No matter how good your English grammar and vocabulary may be, if your pronunciation is so bad that nobody can understand a word you say, then you are at a grave disadvantage in regards to your English. These lessons have been designed to help you to improve your pronunciation, as well as other areas of your English.

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10 of our 99 Pronunciation British English Lessons

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/ dʒ / in Jam

Activate the consonant sound / dʒ / in Jam. In this Pronunciation Activation Pack we will be looking at the consonant sound / dʒ /. We will look at the letter combinations that give the / dʒ / sound. We will look at lots of words which have the / dʒ / sound in them. Finally, we will activate your ability to hear and produce the / dʒ / sound correctly. The / dʒ / sound is a voiced postalveolar affricate made by blocking the air flow with the tip of the tongue behind the alveolar ridge with the front of the tongue bunched up towards the palate. The air is released over the sharp end of the teeth to cause high-frequency turbulence. The / dʒ / sound on the chart is shown in green, which means that it is voiced. This voiced postalveolar affricate consonant sound has these letter combinations: J, G, GE, DG, DGE, DJ, and rarely DI, GG, and DE. 


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/ tʃ / Sound in Chin

Activate the consonant sound / tʃ / in Chin. In this Pronunciation Activation Pack we will be looking at the consonant sound / tʃ /. We will look at the letter combinations that give the / tʃ / sound. We will look at lots of words which have the / tʃ / sound in them. Finally, we will activate your ability to hear and produce the / tʃ / sound correctly. The / tʃ / sound is an unvoiced postalveolar afficate made by blocking the air flow with the tip of the tongue behind the alveolar ridge with the front of the tongue bunched up towards the palate. The air is released over the sharp end of the teeth to cause high-frequency turbulence. The / tʃ / sound on the chart is shown in blue, which means that it is unvoiced. 


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/ d / in Duck

Activate the consonant sound / d / in Duck. In this Pronunciation Activation Pack we will be looking at the consonant sound / d /. We will look at the letter combinations that give the / d / sound. We will look at lots of words which have the / d / sound in them. Finally, we will activate your ability to hear and produce the / d / sound correctly. The / d / sound is a voiced alveolar plosive made by blocking the air flow with the tongue on the alveolar ridge and then releasing it explosively. The / d / sound on the chart is shown in green, which means that it is voiced. Each of the consonant sounds on the first two rows of consonants make up an unvoiced and a voiced pair. The only difference between the unvoiced and voiced pairs is the use of the vocal cords while saying them.


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/ t / in Tattoo

Activate the consonant sound / t / in Tattoo. In this Pronunciation Activation Pack we will be looking at the consonant sound / t /. We will look at the letter combinations that give the / t / sound. We will look at lots of words which have the / t / sound in them. Finally, we will activate your ability to hear and produce the / t / sound correctly. The / t / sound is an unvoiced alveolar plosive made by blocking the air flow with the tongue on the alveolar ridge and then releasing it explosively. The / t / sound on the chart is shown in blue, which means that it is unvoiced. Each of the consonant sounds on the first two rows of consonants make up an unvoiced and a voiced pair. The only difference between the unvoiced and voiced pairs is the use of the vocal cords while saying them.


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/ b / in Bubble

Activate the consonant sound / b / in Bubble. In this Pronunciation Activation Pack we will be looking at the consonant sound / b /. We will look at the letter combinations that give the / b / sound. We will look at lots of words which have the / b / sound in them. Finally, we will activate your ability to hear and produce the / b / sound correctly. The / b / sound is a voiced bilabial plosive made by completely blocking the air flow with the lips and then releasing it explosively. The / b / sound on the chart is shown in green, which means that it is voiced. Each of the voiced sounds on the first two rows of consonants make up an unvoiced and a voiced pair. The only difference between the unvoiced and voiced pairs is the use of the vocal cords while saying them.


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/ p / in Pepper

Activate the consonant sound / p / in Pepper. In this Pronunciation Activation Pack we will be looking at the first of the consonant sounds / p /. We will look at the letter combinations that give the / p / sound. We will look at lots of words which have the / p / sound in them. Finally, we will activate your ability to hear and produce the / p / sound correctly. The / p / sound is a plosive made by completely blocking the air flow and then releasing it explosively. The / p / sound on the chart is shown in blue, which means that it is unvoiced. Each of the unvoiced sounds on the first two rows of consonants make up a voiced and an unvoiced pair. The only difference between the unvoiced and voiced pairs is the use of the vocal cords while saying them. / p / / b /  There is normally no problem with spelling, as both / p / and / b / are always P, PP, and B, BB, though the silent letter P can cause confusion. The main problem for students is between minimal pairs which contain / p / or / b /. In this Pronunciation Activation Pack we will be looking at a set of minimal pairs which differ only in the sounds / p / or / b /. In some words, the letter P appears but is not heard. We call this the silent letter P. The Silent Letter P comes before certain letters, the most common of which are N, S, T, and B. 


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Greetings - Conversation Activator

Practice how to greet someone with this conversation activator which will also teach you some useful vocabulary and expressions. This English Conversation Activation Pack gives you practicing in greeting people you meet for the first time. Expressions such as, Hi, Nice to meet you, Good morning, Pleased to meet you, Are you here on…, as well as showing you how not to greet people and how to avoid sounding rude or worse. You will also learn some new expressions and vocabulary such as: abrupt, architect, break the ice, Christopher Wren, come across as, decent, do you fancy, go out for, going nowhere, gorgeous, hold something against someone, Holland, in banking, intrusive, look good on, Lothario, lovely, married, miss the chance, motive, museum, on business, perhaps, pervert, plan on, pub, reception, something in common, St Paul’s Cathedral, suspicious, take someone out, weirdo, and What brings you here?      


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Consonants 1

An introduction to Britlish English Consonants (I have hayfever so had to use AI voices for this pack). There are 24 consonant sounds in British English. The consonant sounds are shown in the blue box at the bottom of the British English IPA chart, under the vowels. A consonant is a basic speech sound in which the breath is at least partially obstructed and which can be combined with a vowel to form a syllable. Consonants can only be produced with a vowel. There are 21 letters in the English alphabet which represent consonants but there are 24 consonant sounds. The consonant letters of the alphabet are, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K, L, M, N, P, Q, R, S, T, V, X, Z, and usually W and Y. The consonant sounds are grouped into several types. There are the plosives, the fricatives, the affricates, the nasals and the approximants. English consonants are classified by technical terms which refer to the way air escapes as we say the sound, where the obstruction to the air flow takes place, and whether the vocal cords are used. 


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Vowel in Owl / aʊ /

Activate the Vowel in Owl / aʊ / with this Pronunciation Activation Pack. In this Pronunciation Activation Pack we will be looking at the eighth and last of the gliding vowels / aʊ /. This is also the last of the 20 British English vowels on our IPA chart. We will look at the letter combinations that give the / aʊ / sound. We will look at lots of words which have the / aʊ / sound in them. Finally, we will activate your ability to hear and produce the / aʊ / sound correctly. Letter Combinations for / aʊ / - This gliding vowel sound is the vowel sound with the fewest letter combinations, being formed from only: OU and OW. There are two vowel sound which have the potential to cause confusion with the / aʊ / sound. These are the / ɔː / and the / ɑː / sounds. I looked at the minimal pairs / ɔː / vs / aʊ / in Pronunciation Activation Pack 8 – the Vowel in Horse, so I will not cover it in this lesson. In this lesson, I will look at the / aʊ / vs / ɑː / minimal pairs.


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The Periodic Table of the Elements

How to say all of the 118 elements of the periodic table while learning about comparatives and superlatives. I’m not a chemist, I’m an English teacher. That much, I hope, is apparent to you by now. I did, however, study Chemistry at school and found it fascinating. I thought it would be fun to make this English Activation Pack if only to refresh my own memory of the names of the elements. For those students out there who have an interest in the periodic table and the chemical elements, this English Activation Pack will ensure that you can correctly pronounce them all with a British accent. Some of the elements are pronounced differently in American English. This English Activation Pack also looks at superlatives and comparatives in English. Most of the information about the elements contains comparative or superlative forms to give you plenty of examples of how to use them. There are also exercises at the back of the eBook to give you some practice using comparative and superlatives in English.  


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10 of our 99 Pronunciation British English Lessons


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