Responsive image

All 242 Lessons by Date.

There are currently 242 British English lessons in the Britlish Library and I add new lessons regularly. The grid below shows you the 242 lessons available arranged chronologically from newest to oldest. Use the navigation buttons to look through them. If you want to concentrate on a particular area of English, choose the category view instead.

14 British English Lesson Categories

I have categorised the lessons in the Britlish library into the following categories: English in Use lessons, Tests lessons, Grammar lessons, Humour lessons, Idioms lessons, Information lessons, Literature lessons, Phrasal Verbs lessons, Pronunciation lessons, Spelling lessons, Vocabulary lessons, Writing lessons, Sounds Rude lessons, Conversation Simulations lessons, and more.

You can select all of the lessons in each of the categories by clicking on any of the images or links below.


Support Us! Alphabetical List Categories Random Lesson IPA Chart

First Previous 5 Lessons Next 5 Lessons Last

Responsive image

Fun or Funny

A common mistake that students of English make is the use of the words fun and funny. Both can be used as adjectives, but they are not interchangeable and have some important differences of meaning. Only fun is used as a noun. This lesson will help you to understand the difference between fun and funny and give you some practice to help you better understand the difference. I hope that you find the lesson as much fun to do as I did to make.

Responsive image

Nose Idioms

Learn some common British English idioms in this video English lesson from Britlish. The idioms are: As plain as the nose on your face, Keep your nose out, Turn your nose up at, Stick your nose in where it’s not wanted, Can’t see further than the end of your nose, Under your nose, Cut off your nose to spite your face, Brown-nose, Put someone’s nose out of joint, No skin off my nose, Look down your nose at, Rub your nose in it, Powder your nose, and Have a nose for.

Responsive image

Homophones and Homonyms

If we look at the words homophone and homonym we see that they both start with homo which means same. In the last part of homophone, phone means sound and in homonym, nym means name. Homophone means words that have the same sound but different meanings. There are several hundred homophones in English. Homonym means words that are written the same, but have different meanings, and maybe different pronunciations. This lesson uses many of my video English lessons to show you how homophones and homonyms are used, and also has some exercises to give you some practice of some of the common ones.  

Responsive image

Lip Idioms

Learn some common British English idioms with this lesson from Britlish. The idioms are: Pay lip service, Lick your lips, Bite your lip, Give someone lip, My lips are sealed, Smack lips, Slip of the lip, Tight-lipped, Lock lips, Pass my lips, Stiff upper lip, A bit lippy, Read my lips, Loose lips, Button your lip, and On everyone’s lips. This lesson is part of the Body Idioms series at Britlish.com.

Responsive image

Leg Idioms

Learn some common British English idioms in this video English lesson from Britlish. The idioms are: Tail between your legs, On its last legs, Get a leg up, Pulling your leg, Shake a leg, Break a leg, Not have a leg to stand on, Stretch your legs, Legwork, and Sea legs. This lesson is part of the Body Idioms series of idioms lessons.

First Previous 5 Lessons Next 5 Lessons Last

Responsive image

Learn English with the most innovative and engaging English lessons available anywhere on the Internet and all completely free of charge! To personalise your experience in the Britlish Library and to keep track of the lessons you have studied and the vocabulary you have recorded, or the notes you have made about each class, sign up for a free account today.