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All 230 Lessons by Date.

There are currently 230 British English lessons in the Britlish Library and I add new lessons regularly. The grid below shows you the 230 lessons available arranged chronologically from newest to oldest. Use the navigation buttons to look through them. If you want to concentrate on a particular area of English, choose the category view instead.

13 British English Lesson Categories

I have categorised the lessons in the Britlish library into the following categories: English in Use lessons, Exams and Tests lessons, Grammar lessons, Humour lessons, Idioms lessons, Information lessons, Literature lessons, Phrasal Verbs lessons, Sounds British Pronunciation lessons, Spelling lessons, Vocabulary lessons, Writing lessons, Sounds Rude lessons, and more.

You can select all of the lessons in each of the categories by clicking on any of the images or links below.


Alphabetical List Categories Random Lesson IPA Chart

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Bring, Fetch, Get, Take

I’d like to thank Monica, in Italy, for requesting this lesson. The verbs, bring, fetch, get, and take, cause confusion for many students of English. Part of the confusion arises from the fact that these verbs all seem to be fairly similar in meaning. The verbs all describe the action of moving an object from one place to another. What you need to do when using these verbs is to consider where the object being moved is in relation to yourself and others.  

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Numbers and Dates Practice

Numbers can be difficult for students, particularly big numbers and dates. I have designed this English lesson at the request of Nataliya in Moscow who said that she was having difficulty listening to and transcribing dates and numbers. There are many audio files in this lesson. You can choose to test yourself on British English dates, small numbers, big numbers, and decimal numbers.   

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Most Common English Words

If you learn just 4,015 British English words, you will be able to understand 90% of normal, everyday conversations in British English. You will also be able to understand most written material such as that found in newspapers, magazines, and Internet articles. After years of extensive research using the latest technology to access lists of millions of examples of spoken and written English, I have assembled a definitive list of over 4,015 of the most commonly used British English words. If you learn these 4,015 words, you will have an active vocabulary which will let you participate in any English-speaking situation with confidence. Let me show you how Britlish can help you quickly and easily master these 4,015 most common English words.

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Colour Idioms

Idioms are expressions that are natural to native English speakers. They are very confusing for non-native English speakers. They're confusing because idioms don't mean what the words say. You cannot literally translate English idioms into another language. For example: A black mark has a literal meaning of a black mark on clothing or any other material. It also has a non-literal meaning of a record of something bad you have done. This lesson uses a video English lesson about colour idioms which I made in 2010, and which has been very popular on YouTube. The video has also been licenced for use by a Taiwanese publisher for inclusion in one of their textbooks. I decided to make this Vocabulary Activation Pack from the video English lesson because so many people like the video and because the vocabulary in it is important for students to learn and master. There are a lot of idioms in this lesson as well as a set of questions which I have designed to help you learn, remember, and use the vocabulary and make it part of your active vocabulary.    

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Britlish Vocabulary Memoriser

Are you frustrated at not being able to remember new vocabulary? You are not alone! One of the biggest problems faced by anyone learning a new language is the memorisation of new vocabulary. One of the questions that I am most often asked by students is, "Do you have any advice on how to remember new vocabulary?" This got me thinking, and I decided to do something to help not only my students but anyone who wants a fool-proof way of memorising new vocabulary. What I came up with is what I call the Britlish Vocabulary Memoriser. It's free to use for all Britishers. In this presentation, I'm going to show you how it works and how it can help you. I built it to work on any device that has Internet access, from a mobile phone to a desktop computer. All your data is stored on the Britlish server, so using the app won’t take up any valuable space on your system memory, but I hope you will fill your memory with new vocabulary. Let’s see how it works, shall we?

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