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All 239 Lessons by Date.

There are currently 239 British English lessons in the Britlish Library and I add new lessons regularly. The grid below shows you the 239 lessons available arranged chronologically from newest to oldest. Use the navigation buttons to look through them. If you want to concentrate on a particular area of English, choose the category view instead.

14 British English Lesson Categories

I have categorised the lessons in the Britlish library into the following categories: English in Use lessons, Tests lessons, Grammar lessons, Humour lessons, Idioms lessons, Information lessons, Literature lessons, Phrasal Verbs lessons, Pronunciation lessons, Spelling lessons, Vocabulary lessons, Writing lessons, Sounds Rude lessons, Conversation Simulations lessons, and more.

You can select all of the lessons in each of the categories by clicking on any of the images or links below.


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Function and Content Words

An explanation of function and content words in English. The difference between function and content words is one of the key factors in English sentence stress and the rhythm of English. This lesson help you to better understand them. I’ve used the terms function and content words several times in this course up to now. I thought it was a good time to tell you what they are. Function words are also known as structure words, grammatical words, grammatical functors, grammatical morphemes, function morphemes, form words, and empty words. That list will give you a good idea of what they are.

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Connected Speech

Learn about pronunciation in connected speech and how it can lead to missed or added sounds. When students begin to learn English, they learn words in isolation. Teachers drill their students to pronounce individual words as though these words will always sound the same. Yet, words are seldom heard in isolation, and are usually produced in a stream of sound. In the stream of sound, words join together, and interesting things happen where one word meets another word. In this lesson, we will try to identify what added information we can hear in sentences. We will also try to hear what information is missing in sentences. Noticing how your speech differs will help you to correct the way you speak to sound more English. Connected Speech.  

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Sounds British - Word Stress

Learn about and practice syllables and word stress. In this Pronunciation Activation Pack, we are going to practice hearing the correct stress in English words. First, we will practice counting the syllables in words. Then, we will practice hearing where the main stress is in words. Finally, we will look at a comedy sketch which shows what happens when you mispronounce English words. Sounds British - Word Stress

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The Chaos - The Absurdity of English Spelling and Pronunciation

Any student of English will have quickly become aware that the spelling of English appears to have been devised by a lunatic. The few spelling “rules” that exist are of little use, as most have multiple exceptions. The absurdity of English spelling has inspired many teachers and writers to demonstrate just how ridiculously complicated it is. Chief among these was Gerard Nolst Trenité, who wrote the oft-quoted poem, The Chaos, which is the subject of this English lesson. To lessen the possibility of error, I decided to first transcribe the entire poem into IPA symbols. I double checked the accuracy of the IPA transcript with all the extant sources of the poem that I could muster. I then fed the IPA transcript through an artificial neural net speech synthesis program to produce the most accurate rendition of the poem possible. I hope you are as pleased with the result as I am.  

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The Monk, a Romance

Matthew Gregory Lewis (9 July 1775 – 14 or 16 May 1818) was an English novelist and dramatist, who wrote Gothic horror stories. He was often called Monk Lewis, due to the success of The Monk, a Romance, his 1796 Gothic novel. The book, The Monk, a Romance, was first published in 1796 and has become required reading in many literature courses. I have edited the text to modernise some of the spellings to British English, as well as removing most of the strangely capitalised words that are scattered through the original text. The capitalisation was typical for the time, but can be confusing for the modern reader. Included in this Vocabulary Activation Pack is the full manuscript of the book, a dictionary of the 2,196 vocabulary items, and audio for all of the vocabulary definitions, the plot summary, and the character profiles. I have also produced audio files for each of the three volumes and chapters of the book. The audio is available in the Vocabulary Activation Pack in the Britlish Library. The Vocabulary Activation Pack in the Britlish Library also contains a plot summary of the book in both text and audio form. I have also extracted 2,196 words from the text which will be useful to you if you are working on building your vocabulary. The Monk, a Romance

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