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All 242 Lessons by Date.

There are currently 242 British English lessons in the Britlish Library and I add new lessons regularly. The grid below shows you the 242 lessons available arranged chronologically from newest to oldest. Use the navigation buttons to look through them. If you want to concentrate on a particular area of English, choose the category view instead.

14 British English Lesson Categories

I have categorised the lessons in the Britlish library into the following categories: English in Use lessons, Tests lessons, Grammar lessons, Humour lessons, Idioms lessons, Information lessons, Literature lessons, Phrasal Verbs lessons, Pronunciation lessons, Spelling lessons, Vocabulary lessons, Writing lessons, Sounds Rude lessons, Conversation Simulations lessons, and more.

You can select all of the lessons in each of the categories by clicking on any of the images or links below.


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Vocabulary Activation Pack - Smells

My dog’s got no nose! No nose? How does the poor thing smell? He smells horrible! In fact, he stinks! Why is this funny? It’s funny because a dog without a nose would not be able to smell smells, but it could still be a very smelly dog. Smell is both a verb and a noun, while smelly is an adjective. In this Vocabulary Activation Pack, I will be looking at the various words we have to describe different types of smells, be they good, bad, or somewhere in between. Words we will examine include aroma, bouquet, fetor, fragrance, odour, perfume, pong, reek, scent, smell, stench, stink, and whiff. Vocabulary Activation Pack - Smells  

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Vowel in Owl / aʊ /

Activate the Vowel in Owl / aʊ / with this Pronunciation Activation Pack. In this Pronunciation Activation Pack we will be looking at the eighth and last of the gliding vowels / aʊ /. This is also the last of the 20 British English vowels on our IPA chart. We will look at the letter combinations that give the / aʊ / sound. We will look at lots of words which have the / aʊ / sound in them. Finally, we will activate your ability to hear and produce the / aʊ / sound correctly. Letter Combinations for / aʊ / - This gliding vowel sound is the vowel sound with the fewest letter combinations, being formed from only: OU and OW. There are two vowel sound which have the potential to cause confusion with the / aʊ / sound. These are the / ɔː / and the / ɑː / sounds. I looked at the minimal pairs / ɔː / vs / aʊ / in Pronunciation Activation Pack 8 – the Vowel in Horse, so I will not cover it in this lesson. In this lesson, I will look at the / aʊ / vs / ɑː / minimal pairs.

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Future 3 - GA14

The second most common way, after will, of talking about the future in English is by the use of be going to. I have already shown how an –ing form needs the finite verb be to form the continuous aspect. Be going to is the present continuous and acts as an auxiliary verb, like will, to talk about the future. We use be going to to talk about future things which are already planned. We use be going to to talk about future things which we can predict from present evidence. There is often no difference in meaning between be going to and the present continuous. When we talk about events that are outside of our control, we tend to use be going to NOT the present continuous. Sometimes there is not much difference, if any, between using will, or be going to when talking about the future. Only when we have evidence that something is going to happen should we prefer be going to. We can say that we are going to do something in the immediate future by using be about to. This British English grammar is essential for all students of English and the many exercises in the pack will help you master it quickly and enjoyably.      

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Idiom Activation Pack - Food Idioms 9

Idioms are expressions that are natural to native English speakers. They are very confusing for non-native English speakers. They're confusing because idioms don't mean what the words say. You cannot literally translate English idioms into another language. The vocabulary in this British English lesson is important for students to learn and master. There are a lot of idioms in this lesson as well as a set of questions which I have designed to help you learn, remember, and use the vocabulary and make it part of your active vocabulary. If you are serious about improving your British English vocabulary, these common British English idioms are essential. The food idioms are: Red herring, Look to laurels, A different kettle of fish, Chicken and egg, Jam down throat, Too many cooks, Drive bananas, Easy meat, Spill the beans, and Half-baked.    

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The Periodic Table of the Elements

How to say all of the 118 elements of the periodic table while learning about comparatives and superlatives. I’m not a chemist, I’m an English teacher. That much, I hope, is apparent to you by now. I did, however, study Chemistry at school and found it fascinating. I thought it would be fun to make this English Activation Pack if only to refresh my own memory of the names of the elements. For those students out there who have an interest in the periodic table and the chemical elements, this English Activation Pack will ensure that you can correctly pronounce them all with a British accent. Some of the elements are pronounced differently in American English. This English Activation Pack also looks at superlatives and comparatives in English. Most of the information about the elements contains comparative or superlative forms to give you plenty of examples of how to use them. There are also exercises at the back of the eBook to give you some practice using comparative and superlatives in English.  

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