Changes in Fast Speech

Pronunciation | Listenings | Speaking

Pronunciation

These Activities are designed to help you improve your pronunciation and communication skills in English. Whether you have a strong grasp of grammar and vocabulary or not, clear pronunciation is essential for effective communication. Through these activities, you will learn the nuances of English speech, including elision, simplification, intonation, stress, and rhythm, and develop the ability to understand spoken English. Additionally, you will gain a deeper understanding of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) symbols and improve your pronunciation, making you a more confident and effective communicator in the English language.

Listenings

Reading is an effective way to improve one's understanding of the English language. However, listening is a more challenging skill that requires dedicated practice and development. The Britlish Library offers a variety of activities that focus on the speech features of native English speakers, such as elision, simplification, intonation, stress, and rhythm. These activities aim to help students understand and effectively listen to spoken English, including the nuances and variations that may occur in conversation. By working through these activities, learners can improve their listening skills and gain a deeper understanding of the English language.

Speaking

It's not easy to teach speaking skills remotely through a website, however good the site is. To really practice your speaking skills, you need someone to speak to who can correct your mistakes as you go. The Activities on this website will go some way to helping you improve your speaking skills by helping you mirror the speech you hear in the lesson. By listening to the speech in the Activities and comparing it to your own speech, you can notice how your pronunciation differs and make adjustments to more accurately match the speech in the Activities. Recording your own speech is also a great way to track your progress and identify areas that need improvement.

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Practice hearing the changes in fast spoken speech. When we speak quickly, sounds that we expect to hear may be missing. It’s not only sounds that go missing in fast spoken English. Whole words may disappear, too. Sounds also change in fast spoken English and some words will not sound the same as they do when spoken slowly, or the way they are shown in dictionaries. In these exercises, I want you to try to hear what changes are taking place in the fast spoken sentences. We will look in greater detail at the changes in later lessons in this Sounds British Pronunciation Course. Changes in Fast Speech.

Changes in Fast Speech | Sounds British | Missing Sounds | When we speak quickly, sounds that we expect to hear may be missing. | Listen to the following sentences and try to hear which sounds are missed out. | He walked to London when he was younger. | Just to be clear, I don’t know where he is. | Who’s that at the front door? | Let’s Check | I’ve highlighted the missing sounds in the following sentences in blue. | He walked to London when he was younger. | The / t / in walked and the / h / in he are missed out. | Just to be clear, I don’t know where he is. | The / t / in just and don’t and the / h / in he are missed out. | Who’s that at the front door? | The / t / in front is missed out. | Missing Words | It’s not only sounds that go missing in fast spoken English. Whole words may disappear, too. | Listen to the next short conversation and see which words are missing or very reduced. | A. I’m off to the shops. Do you want anything? | B. We need some milk and eggs. Have you got enough money? | A. You’d best give me a couple of quid then. | B. I’ve only got a tenner. | A. I’ll bring you the change. | Let’s check | I’ve highlighted the missing or reduced words in the conversation in blue. | A. I’m off to the shops. Do you want anything? | B. We need some milk and eggs. Have you got enough money? | A. You’d best give me a couple of quid then. | B. I’ve only got a tenner. | A. I’ll bring you the change. | Sound Changes | Sounds also change in fast spoken English and some words will not sound the same as they do when spoken slowly, or the way they are shown in dictionaries. | Take this conversation between a teacher (T) and a pupil (p) for instance: | T: Good boy! Are you drawing a speed boat? | P: I need some more white paper, teacher. | T: We’ve only got green paper left. | P: Green paper will do. | T: We’ll have some more white paper on Monday. | Let’s Check | Do you hear the following changes? | T: Good boy! Are you drawing a speed boat? | P: I need some more white paper, teacher. | T: We’ve only got green paper left. | P: Green paper will do. | T: We’ll have some more white paper on Monday. | The / d / sound in good becomes / b / before the consonant / b / in boy and boat. | The / t / sound in white becomes / p / before the / p / sound in paper. | The / n / sound in green becomes / m / before the / p / sound in paper and before the / m / sound in Monday. | Exercises | Now it’s time to put what we have learnt into practice. | In the next exercises, I want you to try to hear what changes are taking place in the fast spoken sentences. | We will look in greater detail at the changes in later lessons in this Sounds British Pronunciation Course. 

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