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Bring, Fetch, Get, Take

I’d like to thank Monica, in Italy, for requesting this lesson. The verbs, bring, fetch, get, and take, cause confusion for many students of English. Part of the confusion arises from the fact that these verbs all seem to be fairly similar in meaning. The verbs all describe the action of moving an object from one place to another. What you need to do when using these verbs is to consider where the object being moved is in relation to yourself and others.

 

A British English Vocabulary Lesson

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be.

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Random Vocabulary British English Lessons

Here are some random Vocabulary British English lessons taken from the 230 British English lessons currently in the Britlish Library.

What are Vocabulary British English lessons about?

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be. Sign up for a free membership and you will get an email each time I add a new lesson to the library.

Fleece

Fleece

Fleece is a man-made fabric made from a plastic fibre called polyester. The polyester fleece fabric was first created in the 1970s by the company Malden Mills. As Malden Mills chose not to patent their invention, the inexpensive fleece was soon available to everyone and its popularity has since far exceeded that of wool. This lesson looks at vocabulary associated with fleeces and wool.


Phrasal Verb Activation Pack 1

Phrasal Verb Activation Pack 1

Phrasal verbs are expressions that are natural to native English speakers. They are very confusing for non-native English speakers. They're confusing because phrasal verbs are like idioms and don't always seem to mean what the words say. You cannot literally translate English phrasal verbs into another language. The vocabulary in this lesson is important for students to learn and master. There are a lot of phrasal verbs in this lesson as well as a set of questions which I have designed to help you learn, remember, and use the vocabulary and make it part of your active vocabulary. If you are serious about improving your British English vocabulary, these common British English phrasal verbs are essential. The phrasal verbs are: catch up, drive away, find out, fix up, get off, look round, pick up, run off, take aback, and throw down.

 
 

Bring, Fetch, Get, Take

Bring, Fetch, Get, Take

I’d like to thank Monica, in Italy, for requesting this lesson. The verbs, bring, fetch, get, and take, cause confusion for many students of English. Part of the confusion arises from the fact that these verbs all seem to be fairly similar in meaning. The verbs all describe the action of moving an object from one place to another. What you need to do when using these verbs is to consider where the object being moved is in relation to yourself and others.

 

Attracted to or Attracted by

Attracted to or Attracted by

Prepositions are difficult for students of English and when they are used with two very similar expressions they can be especially difficult. This lesson will show you how we use the two expressions attracted to and attracted by and will give you practice using both. I have selected real examples of the expressions from the British National Corpus, and have included several activators to help you with the use of the two expressions and the pronunciation of sentences which use them.


This Week - Next Week - Last Week

This Week - Next Week - Last Week

Do you ever have problems specifying dates in English? This lesson will help put an end to any such issues. I’ll talk you through the way we specify future and past dates in English. I’ll give you some practice with choosing the best way to specify what date you want to talk about. I’ll show you how we reduce complex consonant clusters which form between words in speech segments.


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