Britlish

Tin Tin Tin

Pronunciation | Listenings | Humour | English in Use | Speaking

Pronunciation

No matter how good your English grammar and vocabulary may be, if your pronunciation is so bad that nobody can understand a word you say, then your English won't be much good as a means of communication. You might be good at grammar, have a broad vocabulary, and be able to explain all the aspects and tenses of English, but it's not much good if you can't be understood when you speak. I have designed these Activities to help you to improve your pronunciation, as well as other areas of your English.

Listenings

Reading is the easiest way to take in English. Listening is a much harder skill and one that has to be developed as you study the language. There are lots of speech features that arise when native English speakers speak English. These speech features, such as elision, simplification, intonation, stress, and rhythm, and the way in which speakers may miss out sounds or whole words, are important to understand if you are to be able to listen to and fully understand spoken English. These Britlish Library Activities will help you to develop you listening skills.  

Humour

These English Activities are built around English jokes. The jokes may be old or new; they may be very funny or just amusing. The language of the joke is explored, and you will begin to understand a very important aspect of the English language - humour. Many students of English, be they students of English as a second language or of English as a foreign language, find it very difficult to "get" English jokes. British humour has a strong satirical element aimed at showing the absurdity of everyday life. A lot of English humour depends on cultural knowledge and the themes commonly include the British class system, wit, innuendo, to boost subjects and puns, self-deprecation, sarcasm, and insults. As well as this, English humour is often delivered in a deadpan way or is considered by many to be insensitive. A particular aspect of British English humour is the humour of the macabre, were topics that are usually treated seriously are treated in a very humorous or satirical way.

English in Use

The Activities categorised as English in Use look at the way we use English in everyday life. The Activities cover the actual use of English and examine grammar, punctuation, and functionality of the language. For any student studying English as a second language or English as a foreign language, English in Use Activities are particularly useful for improving speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills. These Activities will help you to develop your confidence in using different types of text such as fiction, newspapers and magazines, as well as learning to speak and write about things such as the weather and travel, as well as preparing you for typical situations such as ordering in a restaurant or buying a train ticket.

Speaking

It's not easy to teaching speaking skills remotely through a website, however good the site is. To really practice your speaking skills, you need someone to speak to who can correct your mistakes as you go. The Activities here will go some way to helping you to improve your speaking skills by helping you to mirror the speech you hear in the lesson. In this way, you can notice how your speech differs from that in the Activities and, by recording your own speech, you can adjust your pronunciation to more accurately match that in the Activities.

Newest All Categories Top Random Courses IPA Challenges Word Games

A quick look at how not all English from Britain sounds the same and how it can be quite confusing for students. There are 100s of regional accents and many distinct dialects in Britain. Many English people have difficulty understanding some of the more unusual varieties of English found in the British Isles, so it's no surprise that students of English are completely confounded when they first encounter such English. This lesson will introduce you to the wonderful world of the English heard in Yorkshire, a region of North East England, and a part of the country in which I spent some of my formative years.

There are 100s of regional accents in the UK. There are 37 main dialects that are recognised throughout the UK, and many different accents in each dialect.  The main dialects have their own names and in this lesson I’m going to look at the Yorkshire dialect. Tin Tin Tin Do you have any idea what a man from Harrogate in Yorkshire might mean if he said, Tintintin? It’s an example of simplification, when sounds are dropped when we speak quickly. The clue is in the picture. Tin Tin Tin What’s in the tin? Nothing! Whatever you are looking for isn’t in the tin. If you asked the man from Harrogate, “Where is the money?” He would say, “Tintintin.” A translation to RP English would be: “It isn’t in the tin.” Ellipsis This happens because of ellipsis, the missing out of some sounds when we speak. In the Yorkshire dialect this is quite profound. Let me explain what is happening. Yorkshire Dialect It isn’t is pronounced as ‘Tint in a Yorkshire dialect. The / t / at the end of ‘Tint joins the vowel in the word in, so we get ‘Tintin… And the content word, tin, of course, is heard strongly but the article the is missed out altogether. Thus we get Tintintin for It isn’t in the tin. Yorkshire Accent Video extract from the 1986 The Story of English by Robert MacNeil, Robert McCrum, and William Cran. Practice I hope that this makes sense. If you travel to the UK, you will come across many accents that you may have trouble understanding. As most English teaching teaches RP English, this comes as a huge shock to many students of English. To make sure that you are prepared for it, let’s do some practice, shall we? 

If you are on a mobile device, or want to open the lesson in a new window, click the button below. The lesson will open in a popup window.

Popup Lesson



Use your study record to set lessons as completed, rate them with a 1-5 star rating, record vocabulary from the lesson for future reference, and take notes about the lesson for future reference.

Not Complete!

You have not completed this lesson yet. To complete it, click the Complete Lesson button.

Complete Lesson Completed Lessons


Lesson Rating

You have not rated this lesson.

Rate This All Ratings


Lesson Vocabulary

You have not created any vocabulary items for this lesson yet.

Add New Vocabulary All Vocabulary


Lesson Notes

You have not created any notes for this lesson yet.

Create Notes All Notes


Learn English with the most innovative and engaging English lessons available anywhere on the Internet and all completely free of charge! To personalise your experience in the Britlish Library and to keep track of the lessons you have studied and the vocabulary you have recorded, or the notes you have made about each class, sign up for a free account today.