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Affluenza

I have designed this lesson to look at the vocabulary of wealth. Whether you are poor, wealthy, or stinking rich, you will learn much about the words we use to describe people who do have money. You will also learn about some common portmanteau words. If you don’t know what a portmanteau word is, you really do need to do this lesson. The vocabulary of wealth we’ll look at includes: acquisition, affluence, billionaire, capitalist, consumer, flush, impoverished, loaded, made of money, man of means, millionaire, minted, prosperous, rolling in it, stinking rich, trillionaire, wealthy, well-healed, well-off, and well-to-do.

A British English Vocabulary Lesson

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be.

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Your Study Record for Affluenza.

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Random Vocabulary British English Lessons

Here are some random Vocabulary British English lessons taken from the 230 British English lessons currently in the Britlish Library.

What are Vocabulary British English lessons about?

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be. Sign up for a free membership and you will get an email each time I add a new lesson to the library.

Archie Grump Teaches the English of Debt

Archie Grump Teaches the English of Debt

This Activation Pack will help you to learn some of the vocabulary we use for talking about debt. You will not only learn about debt now and in the past, but also vocabulary items such as, afford, bank manager, bitter, borrow, buy, checks, cost, debt, do without, essential, every Tom, Dick and Harry, gallon, interest, left over, lend, luxury, money, on the never-never, on tick, pay back, pay off, penny, ploughman's lunch, pub, save up, scrimp and save, shilling, thrill, and willy-nilly. Based on the rantings of the elderly Archie Grump, you can watch a video, read and listen to the script, and then answer questions about the vocabulary in the script.


The Chaos - The Absurdity of English Spelling and Pronunciation

The Chaos - The Absurdity of English Spelling and Pronunciation

Any student of English will have quickly become aware that the spelling of English appears to have been devised by a lunatic. The few spelling “rules” that exist are of little use, as most have multiple exceptions. The absurdity of English spelling has inspired many teachers and writers to demonstrate just how ridiculously complicated it is. Chief among these was Gerard Nolst Trenité, who wrote the oft-quoted poem, The Chaos, which is the subject of this English lesson. To lessen the possibility of error, I decided to first transcribe the entire poem into IPA symbols. I double checked the accuracy of the IPA transcript with all the extant sources of the poem that I could muster. I then fed the IPA transcript through an artificial neural net speech synthesis program to produce the most accurate rendition of the poem possible. I hope you are as pleased with the result as I am.

 

Sell - Sale

Sell - Sale

People sell us things every day. Buying and selling things is what makes the world go round. This lesson will teach you the difference between on sale and for sale, as well as prepositions we use with other expressions like sell out, sell on, and up for sale.


Meet your Meat

Meet your Meat

In this look at the meat industry, I make extensive use of the passive voice. In this lesson you will be looking at the vocabulary of meat production and livestock such as, baa, beef, bull, butcher, cluck, cow, ewe, hog, lamb, lanolin, leather, milking, moo, mutton, pig, pluck, pork, queen, ram, shear, skin, slaughter, squeal, swine, tan, tom, wool, and woollen. Whenever we learn something new, there is always room for improvement. Here is the Room for Improvement that you have been looking for in your British English studies.


Somewhere to Sit

Somewhere to Sit

In this lesson you will be looking at the following vocabulary: a degree of, ablutions, ample, back-seat driver, bums on seats, by the seat of your pants, castor, couch potato, crap, dearth, euphemistically, frame, have a seat, in the driving seat, in the hot seat, ingest, keep my seat warm, lazing, lethargic, lose yourself in something, on the edge of your seat, piece of furniture, plonked, propel, quilted, ringside seat, sluggish, sumptuous, take a back seat, take a seat, take the weight off your feet, tempted, throne, and upholstered.


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