In a Row

Vocabulary | Confusables | Idioms

Vocabulary

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be. The Activities here will help you to quickly develop your vocabulary.

Confusables

Certain words in English are so alike that they confuse even native English speakers. Words like their and there for instance are often confused. The Activities here look in detail at some of the most common confusable words and give you plenty of explanation into how to use them correctly as well as plenty of exercises to help you avoid making mistakes in the future. 

Idioms

I am determined to make idioms as accessible for all students as any other part of the English language. Reading and memorising lists of vocabulary is not the most productive, interesting, or useful exercise in English language learning. I created these Activities to encourage you to not only learn and remember many English idioms, but also to have fun with them, as having fun is a great aid to learning and remembering. It is important that you know as many idioms as possible as native English speakers use them with alarming regularity. I hope that as you work your way through the Idiom Activities you will make some of the idioms your own and use them regularly like a native.

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To say that things are in a row means that they are arranged in a line next to one another either in space or time. By extension, the idiomatic expression, in a row, means that several events happen consecutively, one after the other. This lesson will help you to use this common expression. We need to be careful with the word row, however, as it has several meanings and even different pronunciation. The first meaning is a noun meaning an arrangement of objects side by side in a line as in a row of books on the shelf. The second meaning is a verb meaning to propel a boat using oars as in he rowed the rowing boat across the lake. The third meaning is a noun and verb meaning to have an angry dispute as in he had a row with his wife about his drinking.

To say that things are in a row means that they are arranged in a line next to one another either in space or time ​. By extension, the idiomatic expression, in a row, means that several events happen consecutively ​, one after the other. This lesson will help you to use this common expression. We need to be careful with the word row, however, as it has several meanings and even different pronunciation ​. The first meaning is a noun meaning an arrangement of objects side by side in a line as in a row of books on the shelf. The second meaning is a verb meaning to propel a boat using oars as in he rowed the rowing boat across the lake. The third meaning is a noun and verb meaning to have an angry dispute as in He had a row with his wife about his drinking. It’s unusual in the UK to enjoy three days of sunshine in a row ​. Did you know that you row a boat but paddle a canoe​? A row of seagulls waited on the fence for any scraps the tourists might drop ​. I hate those beaches where there are rows of sun loungers and sunshades ​. There were four pumpkins in a row ​. Two rows of trees lined the track ​. They did not speak for three days in a row after their row ​. My parents were always rowing even when they were rowing on the river ​. I’m not going to get into a row over who is going to row on our rowing team. We ate in the same restaurant three days in a row ​. I’m lucky enough to have four days off in a row ​. The team lost eight games in a row and then won four in a row ​. Her husband bought her flowers five weekends in a row but they ended up having a row because she thought he was trying to hide the fact that he was having an affair ​. I need three days off this week, but not three days off in a row ​. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday will be fine ​. I need three days off in a row this week. I’d like Wednesday ​, Thursday ​, and Friday ​. We’ve been going to the same hotel for our holidays three years in a row ​. Annual global temperatures have been increasing for twenty years in a row ​. The Arabs ruled southern Spain for six centuries in a row ​.

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