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Orientation of Things

There are several fixed expressions using prepositions in English with which we talk about the orientation of things. If you have ever put on a jumper to find that the front is on your back and the back is on your front, or the inside is showing and the outside is hidden, then these expressions are important for you. In this lesson you will learn about inside out, back to front, upside down, the right way up, and the wrong way up. You will also learn the vocabulary: artist, button, conform, design, expose, fasten, hang on wall, point out, printed, rough, seam, smooth, and tailored.

A British English Vocabulary Lesson

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be.

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Random Vocabulary British English Lessons

Here are some random Vocabulary British English lessons taken from the 230 British English lessons currently in the Britlish Library.

What are Vocabulary British English lessons about?

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be. Sign up for a free membership and you will get an email each time I add a new lesson to the library.

Flowers of the Grass

Flowers of the Grass

A short lesson using a video I made of a beautiful haiku poem some years ago. The lesson will help you to learn, remember, and use some vocabulary and expressions in English. I hope you enjoy both the poem and the lesson, as well as the video, as much as I enjoyed making them for you.

Death - Vocabulary Activator

Death - Vocabulary Activator

For the entire duration of the universe you did not exist. Then, one day, you came into existence at the moment of your birth. Now, you are growing older and one day you will die. It’s the one thing in this world that we can be 100% certain about. Is it morbid to think about death? I don’t think so. In fact, I often contemplate my own demise. There is no point in hiding from the fact that we will die. If you accept that death is a natural consequence of life, it will not come as a surprise to you when it inevitably arrives. This lesson will teach you about the language of death and dying.

 

The Periodic Table of the Elements

The Periodic Table of the Elements

How to say all of the 118 elements of the periodic table while learning about comparatives and superlatives. I’m not a chemist, I’m an English teacher. That much, I hope, is apparent to you by now. I did, however, study Chemistry at school and found it fascinating. I thought it would be fun to make this English Activation Pack if only to refresh my own memory of the names of the elements. For those students out there who have an interest in the periodic table and the chemical elements, this English Activation Pack will ensure that you can correctly pronounce them all with a British accent. Some of the elements are pronounced differently in American English. This English Activation Pack also looks at superlatives and comparatives in English. Most of the information about the elements contains comparative or superlative forms to give you plenty of examples of how to use them. There are also exercises at the back of the eBook to give you some practice using comparative and superlatives in English.

 

Into, In To, In

Into, In To, In

The problem of using in to, or into is a problem that even native speakers of English face. It’s a problem because in spoken English there is no difference in pronunciation between the two. Nevertheless, both into and in to have different meanings which are important in written English. In this lesson I’ll explain the differences and help you to get them right. If you're ready to dive into this lesson, click the link below.


Frozen Food

Frozen Food

Vocabulary that we use when talking about frozen food. This lesson was inspired by a student of mine, Monica from Italy, who asked why, if we freeze things, don't we unfreeze them? I decided to make a microlearning lesson that would provide the answer and give students the necessary vocabulary for talking about defrosting, thawing, freezing, and melting food items. This lesson uses short videos to make the message clear and gives you the chance to test your understanding of the vocabulary with a self-test feature.


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