/ d / in Duck

IPA Chart Course Pronunciation | IPA Symbols | Speaking

Pronunciation

These Activities are designed to help you improve your pronunciation and communication skills in English. Whether you have a strong grasp of grammar and vocabulary or not, clear pronunciation is essential for effective communication. Through these activities, you will learn the nuances of English speech, including elision, simplification, intonation, stress, and rhythm, and develop the ability to understand spoken English. Additionally, you will gain a deeper understanding of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) symbols and improve your pronunciation, making you a more confident and effective communicator in the English language.

IPA Symbols

The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is an essential tool for any student or teacher of the English language. Developed in the 19th century, the IPA provides a standardized way to represent the sounds of speech in written form. The British English IPA chart includes 44 symbols that represent the monophthongs, diphthongs, and consonant sounds of spoken British English. The Britlish Library offers a wide range of activities to help you master the British English IPA symbols, improve your pronunciation, and take your English language skills to the next level. Whether you're a student or a teacher, our activities are designed to help you learn, remember, and effectively use the IPA in your English language studies.

Speaking

It's not easy to teach speaking skills remotely through a website, however good the site is. To really practice your speaking skills, you need someone to speak to who can correct your mistakes as you go. The Activities on this website will go some way to helping you improve your speaking skills by helping you mirror the speech you hear in the lesson. By listening to the speech in the Activities and comparing it to your own speech, you can notice how your pronunciation differs and make adjustments to more accurately match the speech in the Activities. Recording your own speech is also a great way to track your progress and identify areas that need improvement.

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Activate the consonant sound / d / in Duck. In this Pronunciation Activation Pack we will be looking at the consonant sound / d /. We will look at the letter combinations that give the / d / sound. We will look at lots of words which have the / d / sound in them. Finally, we will activate your ability to hear and produce the / d / sound correctly. The / d / sound is a voiced alveolar plosive made by blocking the air flow with the tongue on the alveolar ridge and then releasing it explosively. The / d / sound on the chart is shown in green, which means that it is voiced. Each of the consonant sounds on the first two rows of consonants make up an unvoiced and a voiced pair. The only difference between the unvoiced and voiced pairs is the use of the vocal cords while saying them.

IPA Chart Course

The British English IPA Phonetic Chart

interactive IPA chart

This is our British English phonetic chart. It is the chart that we use in the Sounds British Interactive British IPA Chart eBook. It is also called the IPA chart and contains forty-four symbols. Each symbol represents a sound in English. It is important that you can distinguish each of the different sounds on the chart.

Some of these symbols in the IPA chart match the letters of the alphabet and have their usual English sound values. That is, the letter of the alphabet and the sound represented by the IPA symbol are always the same. This is only true of the following consonants: p, b, t, d, k, m, n, l, r, f, v, z, h, w. The rest of the consonant letters of the alphabet have no set sound value: c, g, j, q, s, x, y. Neither do the five vowel letters, which are: a, e, i, o, u.

Take the words cat and key for instance. Both begin with a different consonant letter. K is always pronounced as /k/ while C has no set sound value and its sound can change depending on the word in which it is found. In the case of the word catC is also pronounced as /k/, but it is not pronounced the same in the word chair. The IPA allows us to write down the actual sound of the word. cat becomes /kæt/ while key becomes /ki:/ and chair becomes /ʧeə/. Phonetic symbols representing sounds not letters will be written between forward slashes //. Anything you see written between forward slashes represents sounds not letters of the alphabet.

The vowels

On our chart, the vowels are in the top half of the chart in the red and green sections. The red section contains the pure vowels (monophtongs) and the green section contains the gliding vowels (diphthongs). A vowel is a sound which is produced with the whole vocal tract open so that there is no obstruction to the passage of air from the lungs and out of the nose and mouth. Vowels form the peak of syllables in words. For example, in the word vowel we have two syllables, vo and wel. You can see that both syllables contain a vowel sound supported by the consonants.

The Consonants

On our chart, the consonants are in the three rows in bottom blue section. A consonant is a basic speech sound in which the breath is at least partially obstructed, and which can be combined with a vowel to form a syllable. Consonants can only be produced with a vowel. There are twenty-one letters in the English alphabet which represent consonants. These are, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K, L, M, N, P, Q, R, S, T, V, X, Z, and usually W and Y. The letter Y can be both a consonant, as in the word yolk, and a vowel, as in the word myth and the word funny. The letter W can also be a vowel sound in very rare words such as those borrowed from the Welsh, as in cwm.

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