Chicken Idioms

Food Idioms Course Idioms | Vocabulary

Idioms

I am determined to make idioms as accessible for all students as any other part of the English language. Reading and memorising lists of vocabulary is not the most productive, interesting, or useful exercise in English language learning. I created these Activities to encourage you to not only learn and remember many English idioms, but also to have fun with them, as having fun is a great aid to learning and remembering. It is important that you know as many idioms as possible as native English speakers use them with alarming regularity. I hope that as you work your way through the Idiom Activities you will make some of the idioms your own and use them regularly like a native.

Vocabulary

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be. The Activities here will help you to quickly develop your vocabulary.

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Chickens have always been an important part of British life since the first were introduced to the island during the pre-Roman Iron Age. Romans made them more popular as a food source, particularly for egg production, after Claudius invaded Britain in the first century AD. Today, chickens are the most widespread livestock animal not only in the world but also in Britain. Because of their importance, there are several common idioms associated with chickens in English and we will look at them in detail in this lesson. The idioms include: flock together, come home to roost, pecking order, fly the coop, henpecked, and rule the roost.

Food Idioms Course

Chickens have always been an important part of British life since the first were introduced to the island during the pre-Roman Iron Age. Romans made them more popular as a food source , particularly for egg production, after Claudius invaded Britain in the first century AD. Today, chickens are the most widespread livestock animal not only in the world but also in Britain. Because of their importance, there are several common idioms associated with chickens in English and we will look at them in detail in this lesson. The idioms include: flock together, come home to roost , pecking order, fly the coop , henpecked, and rule the roost . When first introduced to the British Isles, chickens were undoubtedly kept as free-range animals in villages. Free-range means that they were not confined to one place and were free to forage on scraps of food, insects, and whatever else they could find lying around. As chickens are gregarious birds, they like to live together in flocks and have a communal approach to raising their young. The flock is normally presided over by a rooster or cockerel while the female chickens, the hens , establish a pecking order whereby more dominant chickens get the pick of the food and of the best nesting sites. One problem with free-range chickens is predation . Unprotected hens make easy pickings for foxes and other predators at night. Not only this, but chickens will also lay their eggs in places that may not easily be found when you want an egg for breakfast. These problems led to the keeping of chickens in chicken coops . A coop not only protects the chickens from predators, but it also protects them from bad weather. Chickens will come home to roost in the coop at night. They will also lay their eggs inside the coop where the broody hens will incubate them until they hatch . Once hatched, the chicks will eventually fly the coop, even though chickens cannot actually fly. During the day, the chickens will flock together and forage for food. Thanks to the established pecking order, the more prominent hens will get the best of the food and will peck at subordinate hens who refuse to toe the line. Anyone who has kept chickens for any length of time will have observed this behaviour, and these observations gave us the idiom henpecked . A henpecked husband is one who is being constantly nagged or bullied by a domineering wife . The cockerel normally rules the roost with the hens fighting for prominence within the flock through their ability to peck their subordinates.

Food Idioms

In this course, I am going to spill the beans about food idioms, and I know my onions, I can tell you. There are a huge number of idioms that are related to food, and so I have decided to give them to you on a silver platter in the form of this course. Students have enough on their plates without having to read and memorise lists of vocabulary, which is certainly not everyone’s cup of tea. This course will encourage you to not only learn and remember the idioms, but also to have fun with them. For, sure as eggs is eggs, having fun is a great aid to learning and remembering. Bon appetit!

 

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Food Idioms Crossword Puzzle 1

A crossword puzzle with 34 idiomatic expressions to do with food. Complete the idioms to complete the crossword puzzle. The answer words are: Bigger, Cake, Cat, Chaff, Cheese, Drinks, Eggshells, End, Face, Fall, Fed, Fig, For, Fry, Go, Gut, Ice, Kettle, Knuckle, Lettuce, Like, Lolly, Nest, Nutcase, Off, On, Oven, Peanuts, Pear, Pickle, Proof, Quiet, Run, Shoulder, Sky, Spill, Tea, Twisting, and Up.

Categories: Word Games | Crosswords | Vocabulary | Idioms


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Food Idioms Crossword Puzzle 2

A crossword puzzle with 36 idiomatic expressions to do with food. Complete the idioms to complete the crossword puzzle with the following words: and, approach, baby, banana, beans, beef, beer, cook, crusty, dry, edge, end, eye, fed, gets, ginger, go, green, ice, melting, mincemeat, nest, on, oranges, oven, pea, plum, republic, rotten, run, sky, spaghetti, spring, talk, taste, and tea.

Categories: Word Games | Crosswords | Vocabulary | Idioms


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