Britlish

Blood Idioms and Expressions

Body Idioms Course Idioms | Vocabulary | Listenings

Idioms

I am determined to make idioms as accessible for all students as any other part of the English language. Reading and memorising lists of vocabulary is not the most productive, interesting, or useful exercise in English language learning. I created these Activities to encourage you to not only learn and remember many English idioms, but also to have fun with them, as having fun is a great aid to learning and remembering. It is important that you know as many idioms as possible as native English speakers use them with alarming regularity. I hope that as you work your way through the Idiom Activities you will make some of the idioms your own and use them regularly like a native.

Vocabulary

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be. The Activities here will help you to quickly develop your vocabulary.

Listenings

Reading is the easiest way to take in English. Listening is a much harder skill and one that has to be developed as you study the language. There are lots of speech features that arise when native English speakers speak English. These speech features, such as elision, simplification, intonation, stress, and rhythm, and the way in which speakers may miss out sounds or whole words, are important to understand if you are to be able to listen to and fully understand spoken English. These Britlish Library Activities will help you to develop you listening skills.  

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Blood is the vital fluid found in humans and other animals. There are many expressions in English that use the word blood. The expressions in this lesson include get blood out of a stone, blood is thicker than water, bloodshed, cold-blooded, in cold blood, hot-blooded, blood up, blood boils, blueblood, fresh blood, new blood, half-blood, run in the blood, own flesh and blood, young blood, blood clot, blood bank, blood brother, bloodlust, bloodthirsty, blood sport, blood wagon, bloodhound, bloodletting, bloodshot, bloody, blood diamond, and bloodstained.

Body Idioms Course

BLOOD IDIOMS

BAD BLOOD

Animosity and ill feeling between people because of the past disagreement or argument, is known as bad blood.

“All the problems in Romeo and Juliet were caused by bad blood between the two families.”

TO HAVE BLUE BLOOD

To have blue blood is to be descended from aristocracy.

“He claims to be related to royalty, but he’s got as much blue blood as my cat.”

BURST/BUST A BLOOD VESSEL

To become enraged by something is to almost burst a blood vessel.

“My father almost burst a blood vessel when he saw what I had done to his car.”

TO MAKE YOUR BLOOD BOIL

Something or someone that makes your blood boil enrages you.

“The way young people these days disrespect their elders makes my blood boil.”

YOUR OWN FLESH AND BLOOD

Your own flesh and blood is any of your family or close relations.

“Why would anyone treat their own flesh and blood as badly as she does?”

BLOODCURDLING

Anything which is terrible and fills you with a feeling of horror is bloodcurdling.

“I heard a bloodcurdling scream and found her with her hand trapped in the machinery.”

IN COLD BLOOD

In cold blood means to behave in a merciless and unfeeling manner.

“He murdered the entire family in cold blood.”

NEW BLOOD

New blood is used to describe new people brought into an organisation to bring new ideas.

“The only way we’re going to get out of this mess is to bring in some new blood.”

OUT FOR BLOOD

Someone who is out for blood is looking to get revenge for someone else’s actions.

“I don’t know what you said to him, but he’s out for blood.”

MAKE YOUR BLOOD RUN COLD

Something that makes your blood run cold shocks, horrifies, or frightens you greatly.

“The thought of facing them with no protection whatsoever made my blood run cold.”

TO SMELL BLOOD

To recognise a weakness in an opponent and to be ready to take advantage of them is to smell blood.

“A lawyer at the scene of an accident is like a shark smelling blood.”

Body Idioms

I originally thought that I would find 100 to 200 idioms related to the body, but as I continued gathering the idioms for each part of the body, I realised there were going to be considerably more. With an ever-growing list of idioms before me, I despaired of ever being able to complete the definitions and examples that would be required for each one. However, with a bit of elbow grease, I put my back into it, and managed to complete all 522 of them. In this course, you will find many of the idiomatic expressions related to the body.

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Bottom Idioms

The 12 common British English idiomatic expressions are, at the bottom of the ladder, learn something from the bottom up, to be at the bottom of something, the bottom of the barrel, bottoms up, the bottom line, smooth as a baby's bottom, from top to bottom, the bottom drawer, to hit rock bottom, from the bottom of my heart, and the bottom fell out of. This British English idioms lesson will help to you learn, remember, and use 12 common British English idiomatic expressions which use the word bottom. 

Categories: Idioms | Vocabulary | English in Use


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Cheek, Chest, Chin Idioms

The 7 idioms are, turn the other cheek, tongue in cheek, cheek by jowl, get something off your chest, keep something close to your chest, take it on the chin, and keep your chin up. This British English idioms lesson will help to you learn, remember, and use 7 common British English idiomatic expressions which use the words cheek, chest, and chin. 

Categories: Idioms | Vocabulary | English in Use


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Digestive System Idioms

The 18 idioms are, cast-iron stomach, go belly up, to be yellow-bellied, hate someone's guts, gutted, gut-wrenching, not able to or cannot stomach something, a fire in your belly, sick to the stomach, a gut reaction or feeling, butterflies in your stomach, misery guts, turn the stomach, in the pit of your stomach, I have no stomach for something, have guts, to have a strong stomach, and have a bellyful of something. This British English idioms lesson will help to you learn, remember, and use 18 common British English idiomatic expressions to do with the digestive system. 

Categories: Idioms | Vocabulary | English in Use


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