Britlish

Do or Make Challenge

Collocations Course Challenges | Confusables | Vocabulary | Collocations

Challenges

Britlish Challenges let you test just how good your English is against other challengers from around the world. Get the highest score in the fastest time and you can be at the top of the lesson Leader Board. These challenges will test your knowledge to the limit. Are you brave enough to tackle some of the most challenging British English language tests that you will ever find? If so, I invite you to choose one of the growing number of Britlish Challenges in the Britlish Library. After completing the challenges, your details will be added to the Leader Boards and an email will arrive showing you just how well you rose to the challenge.

Confusables

Certain words in English are so alike that they confuse even native English speakers. Words like their and there for instance are often confused. The Activities here look in detail at some of the most common confusable words and give you plenty of explanation into how to use them correctly as well as plenty of exercises to help you avoid making mistakes in the future. 

Vocabulary

Did you know that there are over 600,000 words in English? That's a lot of words, and far more than any human being could ever manage to learn. Even Shakespeare only used around 55,000 different words in all of his works. Mind you, he did actually invent quite a few of them. To get a good mastery of English, you do need to expand your vocabulary as much as possible. The more words you know, the better your English will be. The Activities here will help you to quickly develop your vocabulary.

Collocations

Collocations are pairs or groups of words that are generally used together. Collocations sound natural to native English speakers, but when students of English get them wrong, they can sound unnatural and non-English. Like any vocabulary items, collocations must be learnt individually because they are difficult to guess from the words alone. These British English collocation Activities will help you to learn some of the most common collocations and avoid making mistakes that make it obvious you are not a native English speaker.

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The collocations with the verbs do and make can be very confusing for non-native speakers of English and for students. The 122 common collocations in this Challenge Test will help you to master them. Remember that we use do for obligations, repetitive tasks, and actions, but we use make when we talk about creating something or for actions we choose to do. Make usually refers to the result of the action, while do refers to the action itself.

Collocations Course

Britlish Challenges let you test just how good your English is against other challengers from around the world. Get the highest score in the fastest time and you can be at the top of the lesson Leader Boards. The Leader Board for this Challenge is under the Challenge. You can see all of your own results in your Study Record if you have a free Britlish account. Can you get to the top of the leader board?

Challenge Test

This challenge will test your knowledge about which of the verbs, do or make, we use before each of the following 122 common English expressions: a baby, a bad job, a bid, a breakthrough, a claim, a complaint, a decision, a difference, a discovery, a drawing of a cat, a favour, a fortune, a friend, a good job, a job, a list, a loss, a loss, a lot of noise, a meal, a mediocre job, a mess, a mess, a mistake, a noise, a noise, a number on someone, a phone call, a plan, a point, a point, a point of doing something, a profit, a promise, a sound, a stop, a suggestion, a telephone call, a terrible mess, a test, a wish, an application, an appointment, an argument, an attempt, an effort, an enquiry, an error, an exam, an excuse, an exception, an interview, an investment, an offer, an operation, anything, arrangements, badly, business, certain, damage, demands on someone, excuses, friends, friends with someone, fun of someone, good, harm, harm, headway, love, love not war, make a promise to someone, millions, money, nothing, off with the money, one's best, out the small letters, plans, progress, research, sense of something, some exercise, some exercises, some good, some harm, some research, some tea, some work, somebody a favour, someone laugh, something wrong, sport, the bed, the best of, the best you can, the bride's hair, the cleaning, the cooking, the dishes, the housework, the ironing, the shopping, the washing up, time in prison, time to see someone, trouble for someone, up for not being there, up with somebody, war, war, well, well, work, your best, your chores, your hair, your homework, your job, your make-up, and your worst. Do you know what collocates with the verbs do and make?

The collocations with the verbs do and make can be very confusing for non-native speakers of English and for students. The 122 common collocations in this Challenge Test will help you to master them. Remember that we use do for obligations, repetitive tasks, and actions, but we use make when we talk about creating something or for actions we choose to do. Make usually refers to the result of the action, while do refers to the action itself.

Britlish Challenges

Britlish Challenges are perfect for non-native students of English, for native speakers of English who want to improve their skills, and for home-schooled kids, and even for prodigies who need to be tested to the limit. So, if you are studying English, looking to improve your skills, schooling your kids at home, or just looking for a way to keep your brain active with a few brain games, then the Britlish Challenges are for you.

Do or Make

These two verbs are troublesome for most students of English.

There are some rules which you can follow to make their use easier.

1. Completing Tasks

2. General States or Ideas

3. Creating Something Physical

4. Common Expressions

Completing Tasks

We often have tasks to do, such as the ironing, homework, housework, the washing up, the gardening. We also have jobs to do at home and at work.

When we complete these things we have not created anything physical, we have completed a task. We have done something, not made anything.

In these cases, we use the verb do.

Sometimes we can use both do or make with some things, but the meaning is a little different.

I'll make dinner means I will produce something.

I'll do dinner means that, though I will produce something, I am going to complete a task.

General States or Ideas

I'm not doing anything today.

This expresses a general idea of what I am, or in this case, am not doing. We don't normally express a particular thing that we are or are not doing.

When we express general ideas, we use words like anything, something, nothing and everything.

When my father was alive, he did everything for my mother.

Arming rebels does nothing to help the peace process.

Creating Something Physical

When we actually create something that we can see and touch, we normally use the verb make.

I'm making a cake. We can see the finished cake and eat it.

Shall I make coffee? We will see and taste the coffee.

I'll make the bed. We can see a newly made bed ready to sleep in.

Sometimes, a thing can use both the verb do and make, but the meaning is slightly different.

I'll make breakfast this morning - I will produce something you can see, touch and eat.

I'll do breakfast this morning - I will complete the task.

Common Expressions

Both do and make collocate with certain nouns to make common fixed expressions in English.

do my best

do harm

do someone a favour

do business

do good

make good differs from do good...

1. To carry something out successfully: I made good my escape.

2. To fulfil something: He made good on his promise.

3. To compensate; make up for: I'll made good the loss.

4. To succeed at something: I made good as a teacher.

Make makes many more common expressions than do.

make ends meet

make love

make sense

make a noise

make plans

make money

make excuses

Collocations

Certain words always go with other words. The words just "sound right" if you are a native English speaker. An expression like make the bed is a collocation but many students confuse it with do the bed which sounds wrong to native English speakers. If you do this course, you will not make mistakes with these collocations.

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Fixed Pairs - Binomials

Fixed pairs, or fixed binomials, are pairs of words separated by a conjunction, which are always used in the same order. They sound unnatural if they are used in the wrong order. If you learn how to use these fixed pairs, your English will be more natural and fluent and, as with phrasal verbs or idioms, you will have learnt an important aspect of English. So, if you are sick and tired of not understanding these binomials, or you have hunted high and low for a lesson about them, do this lesson today.

Categories: Vocabulary


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Food and Drink Collocations

Collocations are ground of words which normally go together such as paint a picture. To say make a picture or do a picture sound strange to native English speakers. If you use the correct collocations when speaking or writing in English, you will sound much more natural and much more like a native British English speaker. This lesson looks at some common collocations to do with food and eating. Makes notes of the new vocabulary in your personal Study Record which you will find on each lesson page in the Britlish Library. This language is very useful for students who plan to take exams. This is one of the five-minute collocations series of lessons and should take you about 5 minutes to complete.

Categories: Collocations | Pronunciation | Vocabulary | Confusables


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Health Collocations

Collocations are ground of words which normally go together such as cook a meal. To say make a meal or do a meal sound strange to native English speakers. If you use the correct collocations when speaking or writing in English, you will sound much more natural and much more like a native British English speaker. This lesson looks at some common collocations to do with medicine and health. Makes notes of the new vocabulary in your personal Study Record which you will find on each lesson page in the Britlish Library. This language is very useful for students who plan to take exams. This is one of the five-minute collocations series of lessons and should take you about 5 minutes to complete.

Categories: Collocations | English in Use | Vocabulary | Confusables


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The Top 10 Challengers with the highest scores are:

Spain flag Manuela from Spain!

Completed the Do or Make Challenge on Monday, 14th February 2022 with a score of 200/200 or 100.00% in 2 min 03 sec.

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Argentina flag Stella from Argentina!

Completed the Do or Make Challenge on Saturday, 12th February 2022 with a score of 200/200 or 100.00% in 2 min 42 sec.

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World Citizen flag Olga a World Citizen!

Completed the Do or Make Challenge on Monday, 26th September 2022 with a score of 200/200 or 100.00% in 4 min 50 sec.

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the United Kingdom flag Reena Sharma from the United Kingdom!

Completed the Do or Make Challenge on Sunday, 20th February 2022 with a score of 185/200 or 92.50% in 1 min 37 sec.

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Hungary flag Laura from Hungary!

Completed the Do or Make Challenge on Saturday, 12th February 2022 with a score of 185/200 or 92.50% in 2 min 28 sec.

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World Citizen flag Jacqueline a World Citizen!

Completed the Do or Make Challenge on Sunday, 13th February 2022 with a score of 185/200 or 92.50% in 2 min 50 sec.

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Spain flag RocĂ­o from Spain!

Completed the Do or Make Challenge on Saturday, 12th February 2022 with a score of 185/200 or 92.50% in 2 min 51 sec.

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Morocco flag IMAD-ABDOU RAJINI from Morocco!

Completed the Do or Make Challenge on Saturday, 12th February 2022 with a score of 185/200 or 92.50% in 3 min 30 sec.

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India flag narayanamurthy from India!

Completed the Do or Make Challenge on Sunday, 17th April 2022 with a score of 185/200 or 92.50% in 5 min 50 sec.

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World Citizen flag Val Fom a World Citizen!

Completed the Do or Make Challenge on Monday, 11th April 2022 with a score of 170/200 or 85.00% in 2 min 54 sec.

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